ISHM: APRIL 28 – May 4, 2017

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Key Takeaways:

  • Mosul Displacement Increases as Humanitarian Funding Goals Only Partially Met – On April 30, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reported that displacement to camps east of Mosul has outpaced returns for the first time in nearly four weeks. To meet the needs of the growing displaced population in northern Iraq, the UNHCR requested US$ 578 million for 2017, of which only 18% has been funded. The shift in displacement rates comes as humanitarian conditions continue to deteriorate inside ISIS-held western Mosul. Over the past week, reports have highlighted several incidents when ISIS executed civilians attempting to flee the city. In addition to ISIS reprisals, civilians still inside Mosul remain vulnerable to ongoing military operations. The combined humanitarian emergency and physical destruction inside the city highlight the significant reconstruction task facing the Iraqi government and its international partners. On May 3, Representatives of the Ninewa Provincial Council reported that the efforts to reconstruct Mosul after ISIS’s expulsion from the city will take at least five years, and “billions” of dollars to complete. Thus far, Ninewa Province has only been allocated US$ 44.5 million to implement a two-year reconstruction plan. more…
  • Thousands of Children Out of School in Mosul; Iraqi Kurdistan Struggles to Educate Displaced Population – On May 2, Reuters reported that “tens of thousands” of children in Mosul must work to support their families, rather than attend school. Many schoolchildren have been out of the classroom in the city since ISIS’s advances in June 2014; across Iraq, UNICEF estimates that at least 1.2 million children are not attending school, as they are forced to work and/or are in unstable living conditions. In Iraqi Kurdistan, high levels of displacement from ISIS-held areas has pushed the autonomous region’s education system toward crisis, with over 1,000 new students attending Kurdish schools annually. Meeting this need has been complicated by ongoing economic crisis, and on April 30, the Minister of Education for Iraqi Kurdistan, Bashtwan Sadiq, announced that construction for more than 370 new schools in the region has come to a halt due to funding shortfalls. more…
  • Mosul Operations Continue on New Axis, with Rising Civilian Casualties; U.S. Soldier Killed in Ninewa – On May 4, Ninewa Operations Commander Lt. Gen. Abdul Amir Yarallah announced that the Ninth Armored Division of the Iraqi Army was beginning a new offensive into the north side of western Mosul, backed by the Federal Police Emergency Response Division. The new axis of advance aims to ease pressure on Federal Police and Counterterrorism Service forces, which hold positions to the south of ISIS-held neighborhoods in western Mosul. As the operation to clear the city of ISIS militants grinds on, reports of civilian casualties have risen, although figures remain inexact. On April 30, the U.S. Combined Joint Task Force reported that at least 354 civilians have been killed in U.S.-led international coalition airstrikes against ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria since 2014, while the independent organization Airwars puts the figure at 3,164 civilian deaths since 2014. Civilian casualties in Mosul come as counter-ISIS operations continue elsewhere in Ninewa. On April 29, an IED killed a U.S. soldier on the outskirts of Mosul. First Lt. Weston Lee is the second American to die in the operation to retake Mosul, after a Naval petty officer was killed in October. more…
  • Security Forces Engage ISIS in Diyala Province – Iraqi Security Forces and Popular Mobilization Unit operations against ISIS in Diyala Province continue to meet increasing insurgent resistance following last week’s advance through the Mutibija region on the border with Salah ad-Din Province. Diyala remains a point of concern for an ISIS resurgence and instability. On May 2, Muhammad al-Baqir al-Tamimi, Mayor of the Abu Saida area (30 kilometers northeast of Baquba), stated that unrest in his town would continue until the government deploys troops in the region, following years of terrorist and tribal unrest. more…
  • Turkey Continues Deadly Air and Artillery Strikes in Northern Iraq – Last week, the Turkish military continued its operations against PKK forces in Sinjar and locations inside Iraqi Kurdistan. An April 25 airstrike in Sinjar killed 89 PKK militants, according to the Turkish government. On May 3, Turkish artillery shells killed one Iraqi civilian and wounded seven others in the Amadiya area of northern Dohuk Province, approximately 40 kilometers south of the Iraq-Turkey border. more…
  • U.S. Military Contractor Accused of Misconduct – On May 3, the Associated Press published an investigation reporting allegations of misconduct by defense contractor Sallyport Global, a U.S. company hired to secure the Balad Air Base in Salah ad-Din Province. The piece suggested Sallyport Global employees were involved in activities such as smuggling alcohol, fraud, and potentially human trafficking, as well as various violations of Sallyport’s contract with the U.S. government. more…

For more background on most of the institutions, key actors, political parties, and locations mentioned in our takeaways or in the stories that follow, see the ISHM Reference Guide.


Mosul Displacement Increases as Humanitarian Funding Goals Only Partially Met

April 28 April 29 April 30 May 1 May 2 May 3 May 4
Total IDPs No data No data 339,558 No data 358,410 No data 359,250
Daily Net Change No data No data +3,270 No data +18,852 No data +840

Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) Displaced from Mosul and Surrounding Areas Since Military Operations Began on October 17.

On April 29, Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants killed 13 civilians in western Mosul as they tried to flee toward Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) defensive positions north west of the city. The civilians were fleeing to the Mushrifa area of northwest Mosul before ISIS militants intercepted them.

On April 30, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reported that displacement to camps east of Mosul has outpaced returns for the first time in nearly four weeks. Between April 26 and April 27, over 3,000 individuals arrived to camps east of Mosul, while only 1,069 individuals departed. In the same reporting period, over 5,000 individuals arrived at camps south of Mosul, while just over 2,000 individuals departed. In addition, 250 Iraqi refugees from Turkey returned to eastern Mosul on April 27. The UNHCR also reported that Hammam al-Alil 2 camp currently has 115 available family plots, with 1,467 under construction, and upon completion the al-Salamiyah 2 camp will be able to host 60,000 individuals. The UNHCR has requested US$ 578 million to support internally displaced persons (IDP) and Iraqi refugees in 2017, of which, only 18% has been funded.

On April 30, unnamed tribal fighters arrested nearly 100 civilians fleeing western Mosul. Reportedly, the tribal fighters intercepted the civilians as they fled toward the Hamam al-Alil transit center and IDP camps, 25 kilometers south of Mosul, and transported then to an unknown location. A representative of the tribal fighters alleged that those arrested had ties to ISIS, but refused to provide further details.

On April 30, Iraq’s Ministry of Planning launched the first round of discussions on the National Development Plan of Iraq (NDP) for 2018-2022. Organized in Erbil by the Ministry of Planning and the Local Area Development Program (LADP), the conference hosted representatives from academia, the Council of Ministers, the private sector, trade unions, international organizations, and civil society organizations. Participants discussed immigration reforms, reconstruction, strategies to alleviate poverty, and drafted a framework for the NDP. Head of EU Office in Erbil, Clarisse Pasztory, noted “This NDP is your lead, your chance to have a say. The EU and its partners remain committed to assist and share experiences on good governance and decentralization. Development can actually make a difference and help to overcome the drivers and consequences of war.” UN Development Program (UNDP) Country Director for Iraq, Mounir Tabet added, “Developing such a plan with a bottom-up approach, embracing the priorities and actions adopted at the local level within the Provincial Development Strategies, and integrating the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a first. I congratulate Iraq for this effort and thank the EU for their continuing support.”

On April 30, the ISF rescued 36 Yazidi men, women, and children, after they were held captive by ISIS militants in Mosul for the last three years. Lise Grande, UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, reported that the group was transported to Dohuk, and that the women and girls received “lodging, clothing, and medical and psychological assistance.” She added, “What these women and girls have endured is unimaginable.” In 2014, ISIS militants overran Sinjar, a Yazidi-majority area. Militants systematically executed, kidnapped, and enslaved thousands of Yazidis in what UN investigators call genocide. The UN estimates that at least 1,500 Yazidis remain under ISIS control.  

On May 1, local sources reported that ISIS militants executed 10 civilians as they tried to escape ISIS-controlled areas of western Mosul. Reportedly, the civilians attempted to flee toward Peshmerga forces in Aloaulah, 54 kilometers west of Mosul. Sources indicate that ISIS militants left the corpses in a school.

On May 2, the Iraqi Journalistic Freedoms Observatory reported that ISIS militants killed 21 Iraqi journalists since May 2016, concluding that Iraq remains one of the “most dangerous” environments for journalists. Hadi Jalu Marai, head of the Observatory, stated that journalists and photographers are at increased risk of ISIS attacks, kidnappings, and detention, in addition to other judicial proceedings from government officials. On May 3, the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad released a statement in honor of World Press Freedom Day stating, “The State Department and the U.S. Embassy in Iraq confirm their commitment to support the core principles of free and independent press all over the world, and stand in tribute to the journalists who lost their lives in the exercise of their profession,” adding “the U.S. Embassy is aware of the risks faced by journalists all over the world. Many brave journalists have been injured or killed in the course of their duties, and it is imperative to provide protection for journalists and allow them to perform their duties without harassment or intimidation.”

On May 2, Popular Mobilization Unit (PMU) forces evacuated more than 3,500 civilians from an unnamed village on the outskirts of western Mosul. A representative of the PMU stated that 550 cars and 20,000 sheep were also evacuated from the area.

On May 2, the UNHCR reported that 2,000 individuals were displaced from Mosul between May 1 and May 2, and that “most of” the 358,410 individuals currently displaced as a result of the Mosul operation that began on October 17, 2016, are displaced from western Mosul. Additionally, returns to eastern Mosul continue at a steady pace. Three thousand individuals departed camps east and south of Mosul between April 28 and April 30. Many IDPs who choose to return to their areas of origin cite lack of livelihood opportunities in camps, insufficient food rations for larger families, cramped living conditions in camps, and lack of medical care for patients with chronic illnesses as the major motivations to leave IDP camps. The UNHCR estimates that at least 118,000 IDPs from Mosul are school-aged children, with 53,000 children living in camps around Mosul enrolled in informal education programs.

On May 2, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Iraqi Ministry of the Interior reaffirmed their shared commitment to continue implementing the Community Policing Program to “assist communities affected by the ongoing conflict and to enhance security” throughout Iraq. The program, part of IOM’s two-year project “Strengthening Community Policing in Iraq,” aims to build trust between local communities and the police through training, workshops, conferences, and forums that bring together members of the community, civil society organizations, government officials, IDPs, and the police. Thus far, IOM has conducted 20 trainings, six conferences, and six workshops as a part of this program, reaching over 1,000 police officers, community members, civil society representatives, and law enforcement personnel. The program also includes funding to supply police vehicles, and security and communications equipment. Minister of Interior, Qasim Al Araji, noted “In the Middle East, in general, the relationship between police and communities is not strong enough; citizens may feel restricted from communicating with police,” adding “The Ministry of the Interior is working hard to win the people’s trust through Community Policing, especially as Community Policing has a significant role after the expulsion of ISIL. The Ministry appreciates IOM’s work on strengthening community policing in Iraq.”

On May 3, Representatives of the Ninewa Provincial Council reported that the efforts to reconstruct Mosul after ISIS’s expulsion from the city will take at least five years, and “billions” of dollars to complete. Noureldin Qablan, Deputy Chairman of the Ninewa Provincial Council, stated “After Mosul is fully liberated, we need a working plan to restore things to the way they were before 2014 when Islamic State took over,” adding that the Council has started to formulate reconstruction plans. Under the proposed plan, there would be a two-year reconstruction phase that will focus on restoring electricity, running water, and infrastructure, the return of IDPs, and a reconciliation process. A 30-month phase focused on investment and development would follow. However, there is no room in the current budget to begin these processes. Qablan noted, “Honestly, we are not getting enough support. What has been allocated to Nineveh in 2017 was 52 billion Iraqi dinars ($44.5 million) which is a very small sum for a province this size,” adding “In 2013 we were allocated 738 billion dinars, yet after all this destruction we get just 52. It is very hard to reach our goals with this sum, so we are counting on foreign grants.”

On May 3, photographer Muhammad Hamed published a photo essay conveying the struggle many IDPs face trying to find livelihood opportunities in IDP camps. Hamed spoke to Aysar Issa, an IDP living in Khazar camp, 47 kilometers northeast of Mosul, who now repairs shoes to support his family of eight. Issa explained, “My brothers and I are working in the camp to survive,” adding “We receive little more than 5,000 Iraqi Dinars ($4.28) a day, but we have no other choice since we cannot return to our village.” Another camp resident, Younis Mahmoud, works as a barber in Khazar camp, a profession that was “heavily restricted” under ISIS. He added, “I used to work as a barber in Bartella (a largely Christian town outside Mosul), but when Daesh took over in 2014…shaving beards was forbidden, and there were rules on how to cut hair…I was even fined and lashed when I gave a young boy a modern haircut.” Josephine Elias, a woman who fled ISIS control with her husband and six sons in 2014, sells embroidery and handicrafts, but must rely heavily on her husband for economic support. She explained, “Some people, those with money, asked to buy the embroideries for a small price. Some pieces I just give as a free gift. Many of us don’t have enough money.”

On May 4, the IOM reported that 359,250 IDPs are displaced from Mosul and the surrounding area since the operation to clear the city of ISIS militants began on October 17, 2016, a net increase of 22,962 IPDs since April 27. This increase is due in part to delayed IDP registration at the Hamam al-Alil 2 camp. Sixty percent of IDPs from Mosul and the surrounding area are housed in emergency camps, 26% live in private settings, 13% live in emergency sites, and 1% live in critical shelter arrangements. Cumulatively, 473,280 IDPs have been impacted by the crisis in Mosul since it began in October 2016. However, to date 114,030 IDPs have returned to their homes.


Thousands of Children Out of School in Mosul; Iraqi Kurdistan Struggles to Educate Displaced Population

On April 30, the Head of the Consulate General of the State of Kuwait in Erbil, Omar A. Al-Kandari, announced that a school for displaced students, funded by the Kuwaiti government, will open in Hassan Sham camp in Erbil in the coming days. Kandari commented, “Kuwait is keen to continue the educational process for students displaced even if they were in the camps,” adding that the school is equipped with enough desks and blackboards for 500 students. This is the fourth school in Erbil that the Kuwaiti government has funded.

On April 30, the Minister of Education for Iraqi Kurdistan, Bashtwan Sadiq, announced that construction for more than 370 new schools in the region has come to a halt due to the “financial crisis” and called on donors to contribute funds to continue construction. Sadiq noted, “one thousand new students go to school annually, which is a major burden on school buildings,” explaining that new school construction was essential to alleviating this problem. Iraqi Kurdistan currently hosts 235,000 Syrian refugees and 350,796 Iraqi internally displaced persons (IDP).

On May 2, Reuters reported that “tens of thousands” of children in Mosul must work to support their families, rather than attending school. Ahmed Abdelsattar, a 17 year old from eastern Mosul, left school when Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants overran the city in 2014. His family feared he would be indoctrinated in ISIS ideology and sent to fight alongside ISIS militants if he stayed in school. As the sole breadwinner for his family, he now sells ice cream at the Khazar camp, 47 kilometers northeast of Mosul. Like Abdelsattar, potentially thousands of children in Mosul work selling vegetables, scrap metal, or work clearing debris, rather than attending school. Laila Ali, a spokeswoman for the UN International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF), stated “Investment in education is urgently needed, without which Iraq could lose an entire generation,” adding “Children from different ethnicities and religions, in the same classroom, will promote a cohesive society and will get children to think differently.” The Department of Education in Ninewa Province estimates that at least 10% of children in eastern Mosul are out of school despite that 320 of 400 schools in the city have reopened. However, this statistic is nearly four years old. UNICEF estimates that at least 1.2 million children throughout Iraq are not attending school.  


Mosul Operations Continue on New Axis, with Rising Civilian Casualties; U.S. Soldier Killed in Ninewa

On April 29, Iraqi airstrikes killed Abu Jaber, the so-called “security official” for the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) in Tal Afar, along with multiple Russian bodyguards. The airstrikes hit on the outskirts of Tal Afar, 75 kilometers west of mosul. Abu Jaber is reported to have been close with the ISIS emir of Tal Afar.

On April 29, Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs) repelled an ISIS attack near the town of al-Marahiya, 70 kilometers southwest of Mosul, killing 80 militants. The Imam Ali Brigade thwarted the attempt to break through the blockade around Mosul, and reported killing all of the attackers and destroying all of their vehicles.

On April 29, PMU fighters cleared three towns (Tomit, Boint Mushayrifah, and Umm al-Shitan) 75 kilometers southwest of Mosul. The same day, an improvised explosive device (IED) killed a U.S. soldier on the outskirts of Mosul. First Lt. Weston Lee is the second American to die in the operation to retake Mosul, after a Naval petty officer was killed in October.

On April 30, the U.S. Combined Joint Task Force reported that at least 354 civilians have been killed in U.S.-led coalition airstrikes against ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria since 2014. The Combined Joint Task Force is still assessing 42 reports of civilian deaths. Of the total fatalities since 2014, 45 civilians were killed between November 2016 and March 2017, including 26 fatalities from three separate airstrikes in March. These figures are starkly different from other figures reported by groups such as Airwars, a not-for-profit “transparency project.” It estimates that at least 3,164 civilian deaths occurred as a result of U.S.-lead coalition airstrikes in Iraq and Syria since 2014. Airwars collects data from news sources, non-governmental organizations (NGO), video footage of incidents, and social media postings.

On May 1, the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) reported that a total of 317 civilians were killed in Iraq, and another 403 injured in “acts of terrorism, violence and armed conflict” in April 2017. Ninewa Province experienced the highest number of casualties with 153 fatalities and 123 injuries, followed by Baghdad Province with 55 fatalities and 179 injuries. In Anbar Province, the Anbar Health Directorate recorded 39 fatalities and 35 injuries. UNAMI advises that these figures should be considered the “absolute minimum” number of civilian casualties for the month of April. Figures from the Anbar Health Directorate “might not fully reflect the real number of casualties” due to instability and disruption of reporting services. In addition, UNAMI received reports of civilians deaths, including those due to secondary effects of violence, that could not be independently verified, and were thus excluded from the final reporting. Iraq Body Count (IBC), a detailed public database that records civilian deaths in Iraq, reported that 1,816 civilians were killed in the month of April. IBC collects its data from “cross checked media reports of violence leading to deaths, or of bodies being found, and is supplemented by the careful review and integration of hospital, morgue, NGO and official figures or records.”  

On May 2, an Iraqi security Forces (ISF) sniper shot and killed ISIS militant Abu Yusuf, Tal Afar’s head of defense. According to an anonymous local source, Abu Yusuf was a candidate to be military leader in Tal Afar, should the current leader be killed.

On May 2, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced that new plans were being formed to clear more cities in Ninewa Province. He challenged ISIS to hold onto such cities for “minutes,” and said that most of the terrorist organization’s attacks are now in the desert, rather than cities. No specifics on the new plans were made public.

On May 3, Counter-terrorism forces (CTS) in western Mosul discovered an ISIS manufacturing plant. Maj. Gen. Maan al-Saadi, commander of CTS, reported that the plant produced mortars, bombs, guided missiles, and missile launchers.

On May 4, Ninewa Operations Commander Lt. Gen. Abdul Amir Yarallah announced that the Ninth Armored Division of the Iraqi Army was beginning a new offensive into the north side of Western Mosul. The Ninth Division, backed by Emergency Response troops, are advancing on the northern neighborhoods of Kanisa, Haramat, and Mushairfa. Iraqi commanders hope that attacking from another front will stretch ISIS defenses, making advancing from the south easier for CTS and the Federal Police. Col. John Dorrian, spokesman for Operation Inherent Resolve, reported that less than 1,000 ISIS militants remain in Mosul. The new offensive quickly cleared the neighborhood of Mushairfa 3 on the first day, and pushed into Mushairfa 2.

On May 4, U.S.-led coalition airstrikes allegedly killed 11 civilians including women and children in the Hawi Church neighborhood in western Mosul. Eyewitnesses reported that airstrikes hit a house, killing the 11 civilians and wounding an unknown number of others.


Security Forces Engage ISIS in Diyala Province

On April 28, the Diyala Security Committee announced that Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) documents, found during a recent raid in the Mutibija area between Diyala and Salah ad-Din provinces, outlined a plan to create a new ISIS headquarters in the area. According to the documents, the terrorist organization had planned to declare a new mandate during Ramadan, a plan that was upset by the Iraq Security Forces’ (ISF) offensive operation.

On April 29, Diyala Police seized 18 suicide belts and 65 bags full of C4 from the Mutibija area on the border of Diyala and Salah ad-Din. The amount of C4 found is reportedly enough to make over 500 improvised explosive devices (IEDs). The same day, Diyala police denied social media reports that U.S. forces had been deployed on the ground near Muqdadiyah, 30 kilometers northeast of Baquba.

On April 29, Diyala’s Security Council reported that dozens of militants died in airstrikes on ISIS tunnels between Hawija and Mutibija. Sadiq al-Husseini, head of the Council, stated that the Iraqi airstrikes had successfully destroyed multiple tunnels.

On April 30, mortar attacks by ISF troops killed ISIS official Abu Yahya, nicknamed “the Wasp.” Yahya was a senior officer in the al-Zour Basin, 45 kilometers northeast of Baquba.

On May 1, Diyala official Mohammed Davan al-Obeidi reported that last week’s operation through the Mutibija region pushed ISIS militants into Salah ad-Din. Obeidi stated that dozens of militants are now hiding in the abandoned town of Albu Bakr, 75 kilometers north of Baghdad. Reportedly, infighting between ISIS factions broke out in the town of Albu Bakr, killing a senior leader and two of his assistants. Reports indicated that the fighting lasted for several hours and was rooted in leaders blaming each other for operational failures in the area.

On May 1, Uday Khaddran, Mayor of Khalis (15 kilometers north of Baquba), asked that the Iraqi government to prevent ISIS from using a “secret road” in use between Hawija and Mutibija. Khaddran reported that ISIS uses the road to transport explosives and suicide bombers through the Hamrin mountains. The same day, an IED killed an ISIS official and his brother on the road to Hawija.

On May 2, Muhammad al-Baqir al-Tamimi, Mayor of the Abu Saida area (30 kilometers northeast of Baquba), stated in an interview that unrest in his town would continue until the government deploys troops in the region. Abu Saida has seen continued violence over recent months and years, both due to tribal conflict and terrorist activity. Tamimi said, “the situation in Abu Saida is like moving sand, because the causes of security crises [are] not resolved, and this leads us to call for a plan to impose the law…”

On May 3, ISIS militants attacked a Popular Mobilization Unit (PMU) location in the area around the oil rich Naft Khana area, 90 kilometers northeast of Baquba. The 110 Brigade of the PMUs reported that it repelled the attack, and inflicted casualties on the militants.


Turkey Continues Deadly Air and Artillery Strikes in Northern Iraq

On April 29, the Turkish Army reported that Turkish-conducted airstrikes in two different locations in northern Iraq killed 14 Kurdish Workers Party (PKK) militants. The attacks follow airstrikes on April 25 in Sinjar and northern Syria which killed members of the Peshmerga and Syrian Kurds, and which the Turkish government claims killed 89 PKK militants.

On May 2, Mohammad Younis, an Iraqi Kurd and deputy official to the state owned North Gas Company, and his driver were killed when assassins with unconfirmed affiliations shot into his car. Arshad Salehi, the head of the Turkmen Front, a militant organization involved in the fight against ISIS commented on the situation, saying that Kirkuk security forces need to do more to act as a deterrent against these types of incidents and that because the victim was a political figure, this was likely a politically motivated rather than terrorist, killing.

On May 3, Turkish artillery shells killed one Iraqi civilian and wounded seven others in the Amadiya area of northern Dohuk Province, approximately 65 kilometers northeast of Dohuk City, and 40 kilometers south of the Turkish border. An anonymous local source reported that the victims were hit by the shells while working in their orchards.


U.S. Military Contractor Accused of Misconduct

On May 3, the Associated Press published an investigation reporting allegations of misconduct by defense contractor Sallyport Global, a U.S. company hired to secure the Balad Air Base in Salah ad-Din Province, 45 kilometers northwest of Baquba. The article suggested Sallyport Global employees were involved in activities such as smuggling of alcohol, fraud, and potentially human trafficking, as well as various violations of Sallyport’s contract with the U.S. government. The investigators who provided much of the information to the AP were initially hired by the company, but were sent home from Iraq after beginning inquiries into timesheets and employees being paid for work they did not do. Robert Cole and Kristie King, the investigators, were fired two months ago, and expressed surprise that their findings were not being reported to the U.S. government.


IED Incidents and Resulting Casualties

DateLocationDeathsInjuries
05/03/17Jisr Diyala, South Baghdad01
05/03/17Abu Gharib, West of Baghdad10
05/03/17Nahrawan, East of Baghdad02
05/02/17Canaan, East of Baquba10
05/02/17Gharmat Ali, North Basra11
05/02/17Abu Saida, North of Baquba11
04/29/17Jurf Sakhar, North of Karbala111
04/29/17Tuz Khormatu, South of Kirkuk City02
04/29/17Shura, South of Mosul03
04/29/17Madain, South of Baghdad13
04/29/17Abu Saida, North of Baquba10
04/29/17Mosul Outskirts10
04/28/17Karada, South Baghdad45
04/28/17al-Furat, West Baghdad03
04/28/17Madain, South of Baghda14
04/28/17Ahmed al-Suhail, South Baghdad03

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center.


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