ISHM: December 1 – 7, 2017

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Key Takeaways:

  • Iraq Voices Opposition to Trump’s Plan to Move U.S. Embassy in Israel – Hundreds of protesters demonstrated in Baghdad’s Tahrir Square in opposition to U.S. President Donald Trump’s announcement that the United States would move its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Influential Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, who encouraged the protests, Tweeted that “Jerusalem is ours… our holy land… [it] has a God that protects it and a people that redeems it.” Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said that Iraq’s Council of Ministers is opposed to the move and warned of repercussions that may result. Following Trump’s announcement, the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad issued a security message warning Americans in Iraq of the potential for violence. more…
  • 3,000 ISIS Militants Still Operating in Iraq and Syria – The UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) reported that in November 2017, at least 117 civilians were killed and 264 injured as a result of terrorism and other armed conflict. Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for UNAMI, Jan Kubis, said “…casualties among civilians are a horrible reminder that the terrorists can still inflict blows at peaceful citizens, and that all measures need to be taken by the authorities to protect civilians against the barbarism of the terrorists.” According to spokesman for Operation Inherent Resolve, U.S. Army Colonel Ryan Dillon, there are approximately 3,000 ISIS militants remaining in Iraq and Syria, despite ISIS’s loss of territorial control. Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi addressed security concerns during his weekly press conference, and indicated that the most pressing security needs are along the Iraqi-Syrian border. more…
  • France’s Macron Meets with Barzani, Calls for an End to PMUs – Following a meeting with Prime Minister of the Kurdistan Regional Government Nechirvan Barzani in Paris, French President Emmanuel Macron called on Iraq to dismantle its militias, including Iran-backed Shia Popular Mobilization Units who have come under scrutiny for alleged abuses against civilians, including Iraqi Kurds. In a phone call to Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi later the same day, Macron reiterated France’s support for Iraq’s unity and federal authority, but urged Abadi to resolve the ongoing dispute between Erbil and Baghdad through dialogue and adherence to the Constitution. According to Abadi’s office, the French President did not mention militias during their call. In order to attend the meeting in Paris, Barzani had to travel overland to Turkey and then fly to France – a result of Baghdad’s continued ban of international travel to and from the Kurdistan region. The ban was put into place following the September 25 referendum on Kurdish independence held despite Baghdad’s objections. more…
  • 2018 Budget Law Remains Under Debate – On December 3, the Iraqi Parliament received the latest draft of the 2018 federal budget from the Council of Ministers and referred the bill to Parliament’s Finance Committee. An earlier draft released soon after the September 25 referendum on Kurdish independence had been recalled by the Council of Ministers and included objectionably low allocations for the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI) (as previously reported in ISHM). The latest draft allocates 14 trillion Iraqi dinar (approximately US$ 11.8 billion) to the KRI, a figure that was met with continued objection by Prime Minister of the Kurdistan Regional Government Nechirvan Barzani. Other points of contention still unresolved with the budget include allocations to oil-producing provinces, funding for reconstruction and internally displaced persons, and funding for Popular Mobilization Units. more…
  • Move to Privatize Electricity Distribution Met with Protests – During the week, citizens in Basra, Dhi Qar, and Najaf Provinces protested federal government steps toward privatizing electricity distribution in southern Iraq. Confusion over how any proposed privatization will affect prices, particularly for lower income households, led the Ministry of Electricity to issue a statement suggesting that the public has been misinformed about the process and its effects on subsidies. Electricity distribution problems predate Iraq’s 2003 democratic transition, and is characterized by shortages in power production, chronic failures in distribution, and illegal connections to the electric grid. more…

For more background on most of the institutions, key actors, political parties, and locations mentioned in our takeaways or in the stories that follow, see the ISHM Reference Guide.


Iraq Voices Opposition to Trump’s Plan to Move U.S. Embassy in Israel

On December 3, influential Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr tweeted in response to the news that U.S. President Donald Trump would recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and move the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. “Jerusalem is ours… our holy land… [it] has a God that protects it and a people that redeems it,” Sadr tweeted, addressing Trump directly.

On December 4, hundreds of protesters held a demonstration in Tahrir Square in central Baghdad in support of Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr’s position on Jerusalem. They held up Palestinian flags and waved banners condemning America and Israel.

On December 5, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi commented on the United State’s (U.S.) intention to move its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. He said that the Iraqi Council of Ministers was opposed to moving the U.S. Embassy and warned of repercussions that may arise from the move.

On December 6, Iraqi Vice President Ayad Allawi urged the United Nations and the international community to intervene and reject transferring the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. “It was better for the United States to work to strengthen opportunities for the establishment of a just and comprehensive peace in the Middle East away from this step that might lead to impede the peace process,” Allawi said.

On December 6, U.S. President Donald Trump officially recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, on the behalf of the U.S. In his announcement, he recognized the sensitivity of Jerusalem in forging a future agreement between Israelis and Palestinians, and explained that his decision was “in the best interest of the United States of America, and the pursuit of peace between Israel and the Palestinians.” Trump noted that his decision did not entail taking any position on  any final status issues, including the specific boundaries of the Israeli sovereignty in Jerusalem or the resolution of contested borders…The U.S. would support a two-state solution if agreed to by both sides. In response to Trump’s announcement, influential Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr a addressed a tweet for Arabs and Muslims, saying: “if you abandon Jerusalem, it is the beginning of the end.”

On December 6, the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad issued a security message for Americans in Iraq, warning them of possible violence as a result of the recent decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. The message said, ‘The recent announcement that the United States recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and the plans to relocate the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem may spark protests, some of which have the potential to become violent.”

On December 6, the Iraqi Ministry for Foreign Affairs stated its opposition to the U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and move its embassy there. The Ministry affirmed its support for the Palestinian people and establishment of a future Palestinian State with Jerusalem as its capital. “This step is not wise,” said Ahmad Mahjoub, Spokesman for the Ministry, “[it] could lead the region to the undesirable actions.” He called on the international community to stand with the Palestinian people and reject this step.

On December 6, Iraqi President Fuad Masum warned that the U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital may cause a rise in armed conflict and terrorism. “We reject this decision,” he declared on behalf of the Iraqi people, “[it] constitutes a flagrant violation of international law and the resolutions of the United Nations.” Masum asserted that a “solution for the Palestinian issue” must include a state for the Palestinians on the basis of Israel’s 1967 borders, with Jerusalem as its capital.  

On December 6, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s Media Office released a statement to the press objecting to the U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. “We warn of the serious repercussions of this resolution on the stability of the region and the world,” the statement said. It added that the decision was an injustice to Palestinians, the Arab and Islamic world, and other religions, “as Jerusalem is the address of coexistence between all religions and nations.”


3,000 ISIS Militants Still Operating in Iraq and Syria

On December 1, Maj. Gen. Ali Fadhil Imran announced that the Kirkuk Operations Command had cleared 40 km of oil pipelines in Kirkuk. Imran reported that 800 bombs were removed from the pipeline.

On December 2, the Directorate of Media for the Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs) reported that two mass graves had been discovered in Sinjar. Most of the dead were women and children, with the majority being Yazidis. The PMUs were waiting on DNA analysis to identify the remains.

On December 3, the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) released the casualty figures for November 2017. A total of 117 Iraqi civilians were killed and 264 were injured as a result of terrorism and other armed conflict. Baghdad was the worst affected province; however, UNAMI was unable to obtain casualty numbers for Anbar Province. Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the United Nations Assistance Mission in Iraq, Jan Kubis said, “The two bombings in Tuz Khurmatu, Salahaddin Governorate, and in Baghdad Governorate in November which caused numerous casualties among civilians are a horrible reminder that the terrorists can still inflict blows at peaceful citizens, and that all measures need to be taken by the authorities to protect civilians against the barbarism of the terrorists.”

On December 3, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Mike Pompeo, disclosed that he had sent a letter to Major General Qasem Soleimani, senior military officer in the Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution. In the letter, Pompeo informed Soleimani that the United States (U.S.) would hold Iran responsible for any attacks on U.S. interests by the Iranian-backed PMUs in Iraq. Pompeo said, “I sent a note. I sent it because he had indicated that forces under his control might in fact threaten U.S. interests in Iraq…He refused to open the letter — didn’t break my heart to be honest with you.”

On December 3, Raad Almas, Member of Parliament (MP) for Diyala, said that the deployment of United States forces to Diyala was unacceptable. Almas stated that “We have a firm belief that the deployment of any US force in the disputed areas of Diyala will lead to chaos and catastrophic consequences because there is a popular rejection of the presence of Americans who bear a large part of the current situation.”

On December 4, U.S. troops withdrew from Kirkuk City to the Key One base on the Kirkuk-Dibs road (20 km northwest of Kirkuk). Shakhwan al-Dalawi, the Deputy of the Kurdistan Alliance in the Iraqi Parliament, said that the Americans had not told Kurds about why the troops had come to Kirkuk initially. Speculations last week indicated that the troops had arrived in Kirkuk on a peacekeeping operation.

On December 5, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi addressed security concerns during his weekly press conference. He expressed the need for better security along the Iraqi-Syrian border, especially the areas along the border that have been under Syrian control. Abadi added that “Iraq today has a large military capability that competes with the capabilities of the countries of the region.”

On December 5, Col. Ryan Dillon, spokesman for Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve (CJTF-OIR) announced that there were approximately 3,000 militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) remaining in Iraq and Syria. Dillon also reported that the U.S.-led international coalition had been in contact with Russian forces to avoid collisions and to ensure the safety of troops.

On December 5, PAX published a report about the environmental impact of the burning oil wells in Iraq. In particular, PAX interviewed residents of Qayyarah, where oil wells were deliberately set on fire by ISIS fighters and burned for more than eight months. Wim Zwijnenburg, project leader at PAX and author of the report, said that the “findings demonstrate the need to provide sustained support to communities affected by toxic remnants of war, and to take these concerns seriously. Environmental health risks are too often underestimated and overlooked in humanitarian work and reconstruction, yet have the potential to create acute and chronic health risks to civilians.” On November 18, EPIC reported on the fires at Qayyarah in a piece by Matthew Schweitzer.

On December 6, the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) began clearing unexploded ordnances from Mosul’s Old City. UNMAS had previously conducted an assessment of the magnitude of explosive hazards in the city, during which over 100 explosive hazards were reported by civilians and national agencies. Based on current pacing, the clearance of Mosul’s Old City should still take many years. Pehr Lodhammar, Senior Programme Manager UNMAS Iraq, said that “The extent of explosive contamination in Mosul is of a previously unseen magnitude.”

On December 7, the Associated Press (AP) published a report revealing the identity, and life, of Mosul Eye. Omar Mohammed, better known as Mosul Eye, was a blogger who reported on ISIS atrocities in Mosul during the group’s occupation. For years, Mohammed collected information and posted it online anonymously so that the outside world could have a history of the events in Mosul. He continued to run the blog even after fleeing Mosul by gathering information using WhatsApp and Viber.


France’s Macron Meets with Barzani, Calls for an End to PMUs

On December 1, Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani and his deputy, Qubad Talabani, travelled to Paris to meet with French President Emmanuel Macron to discuss the relationship between Erbil and Baghdad. They travelled through the Ibrahim al-Khalil border crossing to Turkey, and from Turkey to France. Barzani and Talabani were unable to fly from the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI) because the Iraqi Federal Government’s ban on international flights from the KRI has been in effect since September 29.

On December 2, KRG Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani and French President Emmanuel Macron met and held a joint press conference in Paris. It was the first meeting between senior officials from France and the KRG since the September 25 referendum for independence in the KRI. KRG representative in France, Ali Dolmery, said that the meeting was “very important because it comes at a sensitive stage, experienced by the region on the political and economic levels.” According to Dolmery, the stability of the KRI was “of great importance” to France, and he suggested that it could play a critical role in improving the relations between Erbil and Baghdad. In the press conference, Macron commended Iraq for its fight against terrorism, and the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga for fighting alongside Iraqi forces. On the Erbil-Baghdad crisis, Macron expressed support for “the rapid start” of dialogue between the KRG and the Government of Iraq. Specifically, he called for respecting the Iraqi Constitution (including the rights of the Kurds within it), federal control over border crossings, disbanding paramilitary units, fair distribution of resources, and implementing Article 140 of the Iraqi Constitution (a referendum in Kirkuk to determine if it would be part of the KRI or not). Barzani stressed the KRG’s readiness to put the referendum behind them (respecting the Iraqi Federal Supreme Court’s ruling that it was unconstitutional) and to conduct dialogue with Baghdad. He told the press, “We have informed the French president that we have no objection to the establishment of federal government authorities at the [border] crossings, according to the Constitution.”

On December 2, Iraqi Vice President Nouri al-Maliki criticized French President Emmanuel Macron for his statements that day during his joint press conference with KRG Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani in Paris. Maliki accused Macron of meddling with Iraq’s internal affairs, which was a breach to Iraq’s sovereignty. Specifically, Maliki referred to Macron’s comment suggesting the dissolution of militias in Iraq. The Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs) are “an official legal institution,” which helped eliminate Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), Maliki argued. Notably, Maliki draws political influence from several PMUs.

On December 2, the Office of Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi reported that Abadi received a phone call from French President Emmanuel Macron. According to Abadi’s Office, Macron reiterated his support for Iraq’s unity and federal authority over the entire territory, including border crossings. Both presidents agreed on the need to resolve issues through dialogue and adherence to the Constitution.

On December 4, Iraqi Member of Parliament (MP) and head of the Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq, Sheikh Hamam Hamoudi, condemned French President Emmanuel Macron’s comment calling to disband Iraqi militias. “This is a blatant interference with Iraq’s internal affairs and [it is] totally rejected by all [Iraqi] people,” Hamoudi said. He added that if it were not for the PMUs, ISIS would have been “today in the heart of Paris.” He accused Macron of having double standards. He argued that Macron’s comment was against France’s own Constitution, “at a time when…the world’s leaders reject any foreign interference in their affairs.”

On December 4, Iraqi MP Hassan Saleh called on French President Emmanuel Macron to “respect himself” and not interfere in Iraq’s internal affairs, in response to Macron’s comment stressing the need to disband the militias in Iraq. He said that, by demanding the dissolution of PMUs, Macron showed that he “does not want the fight against terrorism, and [that he] does not want stability for the peoples of the world.” Saleh urged the Iraqi Federal Government to recognize the sacrifices made by the PMUs, who fought against terrorism “on behalf of the world,” alongside the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF).

On December 4, KRG representative in France, Ali Dolmery, reported on the contents of the meeting between KRG Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani and French President Emmanuel Macron. “The objective of the meeting is to normalize the political, economic and military situation between Baghdad and Erbil within the framework of the Iraqi constitution,” Dolmey said in an interview. He added that Macron “highly valued” the KRG’s decision to respect the Iraqi Federal Supreme Court’s decision against the September 25 referendum for independence.

On December 5, KRG Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani spoke at a press conference about the Erbil-Baghdad crisis. He said that Baghdad was not ready to conduct dialogue. “Citizens are tired of our repeated calls for dialogue,” he said, but continued to renew the KRG’s call for dialogue with Baghdad. He said that citizens were wondering what were Baghdad’s reasons for not coming to the table.

On December 6, KRG Spokesperson, Sven Dzi, responded to Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s promises to send salaries to public employees of the KRI. He explained that “Abadi repeated more than once… that audits of the payrolls of employees in the region is ongoing,” but that “the federal government did not request any lists of [KRG]… we do not know what these lists are.” Dzi called Abadi’s promises a bluff. “The people of Kurdistan have become fully aware that these are only media statements,” he said, explaining that the people of Kurdistan do not trust these statements anymore. On the issue of border crossings, Dzi argued that they must be managed jointly by the KRG and the Iraqi Federal Government. He cited Article 114 of the Iraqi Constitution to support his claim.

On December 6, Iraqi President Fuad Masum met with President of the National Alliance Party Ammar al-Hakim. A report of their discussions said that both politicians agreed on the importance of conducting dialogue between the KRG and the Iraqi Federal Government to resolve contentious issues. Masum confirmed that the KRG was ready for such dialogue.


2018 Budget Law Remains Under Debate

On December 3, the Iraqi Parliament received the latest draft of the 2018 federal budget from the Council of Ministers and referred the bill to Parliament’s Finance Committee. An earlier draft of the budget released soon after the September 25 referendum on Kurdish independence had been recalled by the Council of Ministers and included objectionably low allocations for the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (as previously reported in ISHM).

On December 4, Iraqi Vice President Nouri al-Maliki met with Iraqi President Fuad Masum. A statement by Maliki’s office to the press said that both Maliki and Masum stressed the importance of resolving the Baghdad-Erbil crisis, accelerating the adoption of the 2018 federal budget, respecting the time set for the next parliamentary elections, and providing the appropriate conditions to allow the return of internally displaced persons throughout Iraq.

On December 5, Iraqi Member of Parliament (MP) Jassim Mohammed Jaafar reported that the new 2018 budget bill in discussion allocated 14 trillion Iraqi dinar (approximately US$ 11.82 billion) to the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI), as well as 10 trillion Iraqi dinar (approximately US$ 8.45 billion) to Iraq’s recently “liberated” provinces (Ninewa, Salah-ad-Din, and Anbar). Other provinces would not receive any special grants. In Jaafar’s opinion, it would be fair to grant Basra Province an extra two trillion Iraqi dinar (approximately US$ 1.69 billion) because it suffered from poverty. Apart from Basra, Jaafar said that the budget is just when it relies on population census.

On December 5, Kurdistan Regional Government Prime Minister Nechirvan Barzani spoke about the 2018 draft budget bill during a press conference. Barzanidescribed the bill as being “bad to the point of non-existence.” He said, “the budget must be for all components and…not for one category [of the population].”

On December 7, Member of the Finance Committee of the Iraqi Parliament, Hossam al-Aqabi, warned that not voting on the 2018 draft budget bill could cause a delay to the Parliamentary elections, planned to be held in May 2018. Aqabi explained that “there are specific allocations to the Electoral Commission in the general budget of the country to cover the financial expenses of the electoral process.” According to Aqabi, an absence of a 2018 budget would mean that the Electoral Commision would lack the funding it would need to operate the elections. This, in turn, would be pretext for not holding the elections on time. He called on the Government of Iraq to order speeding up the budget bill process through the Finance Committee.

On December 6, Iraqi Vice President Osama Nujaifi addressed the 2018 budget bill in a press conference in Mosul. He critiqued that the budget did not allocate any funds to “reconstruct the liberated areas,” and informed that the budget would “be returned to the government to adjust [it] appropriately.” Nujaifi specifically noted the need in Mosul, his hometown, which has been “seriously wounded.” “But,” he added, “we say there is hope for the future.”

On December 7, MP Hassan Khalati expressed concern over the Iraqi Parliament’s ability to pass the 2018 budget bill in a timely manner. “The budget should be approved, but it will take a long time due to the points of disagreement,” Khalati said.  According to Khalati, some of the unresolved issues in the budget include allocations to oil-producing provinces, funds for reconstruction to allow the return of displaced persons, the proportion allocated to the Kurdish Region of Iraq (KRI), and allocations to the Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs).


Move to Privatize Electricity Distribution Met with Protests

On December 1, hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets in Basra to protest the efforts to privatize the distribution of electricity in the province. The demonstrators demanded a reduction in their electricity bills, not an increase, which they expect would occur with privatization. They called on the Iraqi Federal Government to stop the privatization. The demonstrations were in light of a contract between the Directorate of Electricity Distribution in South Iraq and an Iraqi company, which was registered in the United Arab Emirates. The contract was approved by the Energy Committee in the Iraqi Council of Ministers. Due to citizens’ discontent in Basra and in Dhi Qar, both of their Provincial Councils decided to reject the privatization project at the provincial level. However, the Directorate of Electricity Distribution in South Iraq replied that implementation of the project depends on the Iraqi Federal Government. Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi signed to implement the project after the Energy Committee’s recommendation. Iraq’s electricity crisis predates Iraq’s 2003 democratic transition, and is characterized by shortages in power production, a failing distribution system, and illicit connections to the electric grid.

On December 1, Governor of Basra Province Asaad al-Eidani expressed opposition to the motion to privatize electricity services in his province. “The local government in Basra is following with great interest the popular objections,” Eidani said, and justified the popular resentment. He explained that the new prices were “burdensome and increase the suffering of citizens, especially those with limited income.” Since the Government of Iraq bypassed the Provincial Council of Basra in the implementation of this project, Eidani suggested that his province might take the issue to the Federal Court for resolution. He concluded his address in words of support of peaceful protest: ‘While we affirm the right of all citizens to demonstrate peacefully, protest and express opinion in accordance with the constitutional and legal frameworks, we will consistently warn against the consequences of attacking any employee in the electricity services, or damage to public property.”

On December 2, hundreds of demonstrators in Najaf Province protested against the privatization of electricity services. Several similar protests occurred throughout southern Iraq. The demonstrators in Najaf called on the Government of Iraq to hold corrupt officials accountable and disclose billions of dollars lost due to administrative and financial corruption.

On December 2, Member of Parliament (MP) from Basra Province, Faleh al-Khazali, expressed support for the popular movement opposing the privatization of the electricity services. He noted that the climate in Basra was hotter than in any province in Iraq, with humidity levels reaching 90% and temperatures reaching 50 degrees Celsius during the summer. He argued that the residents of Basra had a greater need for air conditioning than the rest of Iraq, so a rise in electricity prices would hurt them more. He demanded that the Iraqi Prime Minister take those differences into consideration.

On December 3, Deputy of the Badr Party, Adel al-Mansouri, pledged that his party would do all it could to prevent the privatization of electricity services in Basra. He described the privatization motion as an ‘unfair violation of the rights.” He added, “[We] will do our moral and religious duty to protect the people of our dear province.”

On December 3, the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity released a statement to the press explaining their motion to privatize electricity services in southern Iraq. It explained that the public and media were misinformed about the process and did not understand that the pricing of electricity for citizens was subsidized and would not change as a result of partnering with private companies. The ministry warned that the protestors were hurting their own interests by opposing the project. It argued, “Success stories have been achieved in all areas where this project has been implemented.” Similar projects have previously been implemented in Baghdad.  

On December 5, Iraqi MP and member of the Parliamentary legal committee, Hamdiya al-Husseini, stated her objection to the motion to privatize electricity services in Basra and demanded that the Government of Iraq “reconsider this project because it harms the rights of the poor.” Additionally, she expressed her “full readiness to adopt a popular campaign to reject the privatization project.”

On December 6, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi commented on the issue of electricity prices. He said that the public is being misled and lied to by people seeking political gain. “We take into account the poor and low-income groups,” he said, “especially on the subject of collection of electricity.”


IED Incidents and Resulting Casualties

DateLocationDeathsInjuries
12/06/17Kurdish refugee camp, Makhmour District, southern Erbil Province16
12/05/17Rashad (20 km west of Baghdad), Anbar Province10
12/05/17Zaidan (20 km west of Baghdad) in Abu Ghraib District, Anbar Province11
12/04/17Arab Ejbur (at the southern outskirts of Baghdad), Babil District15
12/04/17Diwan area, western Baghdad03
12/03/17Tarmiyah (42 km north of Baghdad), Salah ad-Din Province12
12/03/17Eastern Baghdad04
12/02/17Taji District (north of Baghdad), Salah ad-Din Province05
12/01/17Madain (20 km southeast of Baghdad), Diyala Province14
12/01/17Suwaib District, southwest Baghdad Province03

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center.


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