ISHM: March 16 – 22, 2018

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Key Takeaways:

  • Baghdad Pays Kurdish Salaries; Kirkuk-Erbil Road Reopens – The Iraqi Federal Government transferred 317 billion Iraqi dinar (approximately US$ 267 million) to the Kurdistan Regional Government this week, to pay the monthly salaries of KRG employees and the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga. The transfer is the first such payment since 2014, when the KRG took control of oil fields in Kirkuk Province and began selling the oil independently, following the Iraqi Army’s retreat from the area. Although a spokesman for the Federal Government could not confirm future payments, the transfer is a sign of continued improved relations between Baghdad and the KRG, which have been strained since the September 2017 referendum on Kurdish independence. Also this week, Major General Maan al-Saadi, head of security in Kirkuk Province, announced that the road from Kirkuk City to Erbil would reopen. The road has been closed for five months, following clashes between the Peshmerga and Iraqi Security Forces in northern Kirkuk Province on October 16, 2017 (as previously reported in ISHM). more…
  • Turkey Continues Attacks on PKK in Northern Iraq, Erdogan Threatens Escalation – On March 18, Kermanj Izzat, head of the Suran District in Erbil Province, reported that Turkish forces had penetrated Iraqi Kurdistan’s borders by more than 15 kilometers while pursuing members of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). Izzat reported that Turkish forces established fixed military positions inside the border and were expected to be there for an extended period. Gorran Party Deputy Ali Hama Saleh called the incursion a violation of Iraqi sovereignty. The following day, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that “Turkey will enter Sinjar without warning to clear it from [PKK] terrorists” if the Iraqi government fails to do so. Turkish media reported that Turkey intends to establish a military base in northern Iraq and Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs Mevlut Cavasoglu said that “…our army will do [in Northern Iraq] what we did in Afrin [Syria].” Turkish targeting of PKK elements in Iraq has been ongoing for several years with varying degrees of rhetoric and threats by Turkish leaders. more…
  • Yazidi MP: Sinjar Children Still Held by ISIS in Syria; Missing Indian Laborers Identified – Member of Iraqi Parliament Vian Dakhil said in a statement this week that “based on reliable information, and the testimony of an 11-year-old Yazidi child who managed to escape” from ISIS captivity in Syria to Iraq, over 100 children abducted from Sinjar since 2014 remain alive and are being held by the terrorist group. Dakhil called on the Iraqi government to intervene. Her comments follow claims by a 17-year-old Yazidi boy, Sufyan Rashid Hajji, that he was kidnapped by ISIS in August 2014 and recently escaped an ISIS training camp in Syria with the help of Kurdish forces. Separately, the government of India announced that 39 Indian workers kidnapped by ISIS near Mosul in 2014 have been confirmed dead after their bodies were identified using DNA. The Indian government had speculated since 2014 that the men could have been alive and tried to secure their release. more…
  • Seven U.S. Servicemembers Killed in Helicopter Crash Near Qa’im – Seven U.S. servicemembers were killed on March 15 when the helicopter they were riding in crashed near Qa’im, in western Anbar Province. The victims were Marc Weber, 29, of Colorado Springs, Colorado; Andreas O’Keeffe, 37, of Center Moriches, New York; Christopher Zanetis, 37, of Long Island City, New York; Christopher Raguso, 39, of Commack, New York; Dashan Briggs, 30, of Port Jefferson Station, New York; William Posch, 36, of Indialantic, Florida; and Carl Enis, 31, of Tallahassee, Florida. The crash is under investigation, but is not believed to be the result of enemy action. more…
  • FIFA Lifts Ban on Official Soccer Matches in Iraq – President of the International Football Federation (FIFA), Gianni Infantino, announced the lifting of a ban on competitive international soccer matches in Iraq. Three stadiums, in Basra, Karbala, and Erbil, will be permitted to host official matches, but the governing organization rejected requests for Baghdad to join that list at the present time. The ban has been in effect intermittently since 1990 due to changing political and security concerns. The news was celebrated across Iraq with Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi calling it a testament to the “security and stability” of the country. more…
  • World Bank Assists in Reconstructing Mosul’s Bridges, UAE Offers to Rebuild al-Nuri Mosque – World Bank Vice President for the MENA Region, Hafez Ghanem, visited Mosul and announced support for the rehabilitation of three vital bridges across the Tigris that were intentionally destroyed during efforts to rid the city of ISIS militants in 2016-17. The restoration of the three bridges is part of a broader joint plan that targets 14 bridges in liberated areas to be completed by 2020, the Iraq Emergency Operation for Development Project worth US$ 750 million. Separately, the United Arab Emirates put forth an offer to help Iraq reconstruct Mosul’s famed al-Nuri Mosque and the al-Hadba Minaret, built nearly 850 years ago but destroyed by ISIS in June 2017. more…

For more background on most of the institutions, key actors, political parties, and locations mentioned in our takeaways or in the stories that follow, see the ISHM Reference Guide.


Baghdad Pays Kurdish Salaries; Kirkuk-Erbil Road Reopens

On March 16, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi told United States (U.S.) Vice President Mike Pence in a phone call that Iraq is working on a long-term plan with the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) as well as reducing the number of U.S. military advisors and trainers in Iraq. Pence also congratulated Abadi on Iraq’s victory over the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS).

On March 16, Major General Maan al-Saadi, head of Kirkuk Province security, confirmed that there were no security concerns over the reopening of the Kirkuk-Erbil road. Saadi said that there were some minor issues upon which the federal government and the KRG still had not agreed, but once those were resolved, the road would be reopened. Saadi added that the decision of reopening the road “remains in the hands of the government and the relevant technical security committees.” The road has been closed for five months, following clashes between Peshmerga forces and Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) in northern Kirkuk Province on October 16, 2017.

On March 16, an official security source reported that the Federal Police forces began the process of reopening the Kirkuk-Erbil road. This came after the Iraqi federal government decided to lift the air embargo on the airports in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI), which had been imposed on September 29, 2017 ostensibly as a response to the Kurdish independence referendum.

On March 17, Muzahim Al-Hewitt, a spokesman for the Arab tribes in Ninewa Province, announced that a senior U.S. delegation would visit Baghdad and Erbil to discuss joint administration of the disputed territories. According to Hewitt, the U.S. delegation will also discuss the redeployment of Peshmerga forces alongside the ISF to these territories. The delegation is due next week.

On March 18, Mohammed Kamal, a Kurdish leader in the Kirkuk Provincial Council, reported that the Council has filed a lawsuit against Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi for the “occupation” of Kirkuk by Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs). He said, “The Kirkuk Provincial Council filed a lawsuit against Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and his collaborators on the background of the events of 16 October last year, which resulted [in] the occupation of the city of Kirkuk by the [Popular Mobilization Units].”

On March 19, the Iraqi federal government sent money to pay salaries of government employees in the KRI for the first time since 2014. However, the two governments have yet to agree on a full plan to resume payments. Saad al-Hadithi, the Iraqi federal government’s spokesman, said that “The federal finance ministry transferred a cash sum of 317 billion Iraqi dinars (approximately US$ 267 million) to the [KRI’s] finance ministry.”

On March 21, Iraqi Counter-terrorism Service (CTS) forces arrested three people working for the Kurdish newspaper Rudaw in the city of Kirkuk, the journalists Huner Ahmad and Hardi Muhammad, and the photographer Zana Taqi al-Din. In a statement, Rudaw considered the arrest as a violation of the freedom of press and said that the arrest was made without a court order. Mahdi Zarian, secretary of the Kurdistan Journalists Syndicate for the Kirkuk branch, called on the KRG to “work at the highest levels to help these journalists before they are severely harmed in the hands of the Iraqi counter-terrorism forces.”


Turkey Continues Attacks on PKK in Northern Iraq, Erdogan Threatens Escalation

On March 18, Hafal Abu Bakr, the Governor of Sulaimania, announced three days of mourning in the province because of the Turkish operations in Afrin. Abu Bakr also announced that all Nowruz celebrations would be cancelled in observation.

On March 18, the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) repudiated the Governor of Sulaimania’s decision to hold three days of mourning for Afrin. According to the KRG, the decision was not within the Governor’s legal or administrative powers.

On March 18, Kermanj Izzat, the head of the Suran District in Erbil Province of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI), reported that Turkish forces had penetrated the KRG borders for more than 10 kilometers after fighting against members of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). Izzat added that the Turkish forces were supported by air cover and were currently stationed in the area of Sidakan, north of Erbil in the KRI. He said that Turkish forces established fixed military positions in the border triangle among Turkey, Iraq and Iran and they were expected to be there for an extended period of time. Izzat did not say whether there were casualties among Turkish forces or the PKK, but Turkish media reported casualties on both sides.

On March 18, a local official said clashes between Turkish forces and the PKK militants happened in the Turkish-Iranian border triangle, indicating that the Turkish forces penetrated about 15 kilometers inside Iraqi territory and established a military barracks. Sidakan Provincial Director Ihsan Chalabi said strong confrontation was witnessed at the Turkish-Iranian border triangle between the Turkish army and the PKK militants two days ago. Chalabi noted that, “the Turkish forces used heavy weapons and aircrafts during the confrontation.” The KRG officials confirmed earlier, the incursion of the Turkish forces was approximately 5 kilometers into the territory in Sidakan, Erbil Province, located in the triangle of the Iraqi-Turkish border.

On March 18, the Deputy of the Gorran Party, Ali Hama Saleh considered the operation on Iraqi soil against the Kurds a violation of Iraqi sovereignty, and called on Iraqi officials and the international community to intervene against Turkey’s “invasion.” Saleh said, “The Turkish forces have moved approximately 15 kilometers inside of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Turkish forces have reached a number of villages in the Sidakan District, including the village of Brazker and Tobazawa.”

On March 19, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hinted at the possibility of carrying out military operations against PKK elements in Sinjar, Ninewa Province. During a speech in Ankara, Erdogan said that he has been in contact with the Iraqi government in regards to PKK presence in northern Iraq and that he has demanded they take the necessary measures, otherwise “Turkey will enter Sinjar without warning to clear it from terrorists.” Erdogan added that the Iraq central government has informed Turkey that it would do what was necessary and that it would eventually ask for Turkey’s help should it be needed.

On March 20, the PKK released a statement saying that its forces had killed two Turkish soldiers in the KRI. The statement read that “our forces launched an attack against a position of the Turkish Army on the border area of Bradost, Sidakan District, north of Erbil.” The statement also added that this attack was carried out in response to Turkish military operations in the area.

On March 22, Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs Mevlut Cavasoglu affirmed that Turkey welcomes the rapprochement between Erbil and Baghdad, and the solution of the conflicts between the two sides. Cavasoglu said that “we do not have enmity with the Kurds of Iraq,” but added that “we prepare to attack Qandil and Sinjar and our army will do what we did in Afrin.” Turkish media reported this week that Turkey intends to establish a military base in northern Iraq.

On March 22, four people died following a Turkish airstrike. The bombing was carried out in the Balakati District, approximately 155 kilometers northeast of Erbil, and it targeted PKK elements.


Yazidi MP: Sinjar Children Still Held by ISIS in Syria; Missing Indian Laborers Identified

On March 15, Alsumaria reported a case about a 17-year-old young Yazidi named Sufyan Rashid Hajji, who was claimed to be kidnapped by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) in August 2014, and recently escaped from an ISIS training camp. According to Sufyan, he was arrested by a group of Yazidi children in Sinjar, Ninewa Province in 2014, and was held in the prison of ISIS in Badush, Mosul and Tal Afar. He was forced to train in the camps with other Yazidi children until he was injured during an Iraqi Security Forces mission near the Iraqi-Syrian Border, which led to the amputation of one of his feet. Sufyan managed to escape from the camp during his stay in the hospital in Hasaka with help from Kurdish forces. Sufyan explained that “more than 33 children were in the same camp with me. About 15 of them blew themselves up in the areas of Raqqa and Deir Zor and Mosul after brainwashing intensively.”

On March 19, an Iraqi Member of Parliament (MP) Vian Dakhil said a number of Yazidi children were kidnapped by ISIS since 2014. Dakhil said in a statement that “based on reliable information, and the testimony of a 11-year-old Yazidi child who managed to escape from the Syrian side to the Iraqi side, there are approximately 120 children abducted from Sinjar who are still in the grips of ISIS. The children range from 11 to 13 years old, and are forced to wear uniforms by terrorists. They were highly likely to be involved in the battlefields.” Dahil called on the Iraqi government to intervene at the highest levels to rescue these child victims. The preliminary information indicated that ISIS had abducted some 1,060 Yazidi children who were then placed in training and brainwashing camps.

On March 20, India announced that 39 India natives, who were kidnapped by ISIS in Iraq in 2014, have been confirmed dead after their bodies were found and DNA samples matched. Indian Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj said that the bodies were recovered from a mound in Badush, approximately 35 kilometers north of Mosul. DNA tests confirmed the bodies to be those of construction workers who went missing from Mosul in 2014. “Shattered at the heart-wrenching news … that the 39 Indians missing in Iraq, most of whom were Punjabis, are dead,” Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh said on Twitter. The Indian government has maintained for years that it believed the men were alive and it was trying to secure their release.


Seven U.S. Servicemembers Killed in Helicopter Crash Near Qa’im

On March 16, Shafaaq News reported on the crash of a United States (U.S.) military helicopter that crashed on March 15 in the city of Qa’im, in western Anbar Province. The helicopter had seven American servicemembers aboard but U.S. officials could not confirm how many of them were killed. Major Adrian J. Rankine-Galloway, a spokesman for the Pentagon, said that the rescue personnel had been deployed to the area and that the crash was under investigation.

On March 16, the Combined Joint Task Force released a statement announcing that all the servicemembers aboard the helicopter that crashed in Qa’im, Anbar Province, on March 15 were killed. The crash is under investigation but it is not believed to be the result of enemy action.  

On March 17, the U.S. Air Force identified the seven servicemembers who died in the helicopter crash on March 15 in Qa’im, western Iraq. The victims were Marc Weber, 29, of Colorado Springs, Colorado; Andreas O’Keeffe, 37, of Center Moriches, New York; Christopher Zanetis, 37, of Long Island City, New York; Christopher Raguso, 39, of Commack, New York; Dashan Briggs, 30, of Port Jefferson Station, New York; William Posch, 36, of Indialantic, Florida; and Carl Enis, 31, of Tallahassee, Florida.


FIFA Lifts Ban on Official Soccer Matches in Iraq

On March 16, President of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), Gianni Infantino, announced the lifting of a ban on hosting competitive international soccer matches at stadiums in three Iraqi cities. Infantino stressed that the final decision will be announced by the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) about lifting the ban on the stadiums in Basra, Karbala and Erbil at the FIFA Council Meeting in Bogota, Colombia.

On March 16, the Ambassador of Iraq to Russia, Haidar Mansour Hadi Al-Athari, confirmed the support for the lifting of the ban for three Iraqi cities and voted for it at the FIFA Council meeting in Bogota. He said, “The Russian Sports Ministry informed us that the President of the Russian Football Federation Nikolai Tolstich received the embassy’s urgent note on Russian support in Iraq during the session of FIFA Council meeting,” noting that “Russia confirmed its support by voting to lift the ban on Iraqi stadiums.”

On March 17, the Iraqi Foreign Minister, Ibrahim al-Jaafari, welcomed the announcement of lifting the ban on stadiums in Basra, Karbala and Erbil in Iraq, and said he hoped to achieve the lifting of the total ban on all the stadiums in Iraq, especially in Baghdad. The Spokesman of the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ahmed Mahjoub, announced that “the Iraqi Foreign Ministry welcomes lifting the ban on the stadiums of Basra, Karbala and Erbil”, saying it would continue to move in order to lift the ban completely on all the country’s stadiums.

On March 17, President of FIFA Gianni Infantino called the head of the Iraq Football Association (IFA) Abdel Khalik Massoud and congratulated him on the decision to lift the ban on Iraqi stadiums. The IFA said in a brief statement that “The AFC has decided to postpone the matches between Al-Zawra, Manama, Bahrain, Air Force and Al-Malikiya from February until next April after FIFA refused to hold the two games before the decision to lift the ban on Iraqi football.”

On March 17, the head of the IFA, Abdul Khaliq Massoud announced in a statement, “After the meeting of the International Federation, we received a call from the FIFA president’s office stating that FIFA agreed to lift the ban on the three Iraqi stadiums, Basra, Karbala and Erbil.” He added that “the FIFA Congress transmitted the official announcement to the AFC as the party to submit the file of Iraq to lift the ban on Iraqi stadiums.” The International Federation also rejected the proposal to establish matches of International Friendship Championship in Baghdad at the present time. There were files to be submitted later to convince the International Federation of the possibility of the capital cities to be added on the list of lifting the ban.

On March 20, a meeting coordinated between the press and the technical support for the coming International Friendship Championship was held at the Sheraton Hotel, Basra. The International Friendship Championship will kick off its first game between Iraq and Qatar on March 22 in the Basra International Stadium. The press conference was attended by the Syria, Qatar, and Iraq Coaches.

On March 22, the Ministry of Youth and Sports announced that the International People’s Stadium will host a show in support of lifting the ban on Baghdad. This march would be between the Iraq team and other Arab countries teams, parallel with the International Friendship Championship in Barsa, urging the lift of the ban on Baghdad stadiums. The President FIFA Gianni Infantino has confirmed, at its meeting on March 16, refused to lift the ban on the stadiums of Baghdad.

On March 22, the Ministry of Youth and Sports announced that, the Qatar Football Association officially stated through the media to transfer 24th Arabian Gulf Cup host right to Iraq. The Iraqi Minister of Youth and Sports Abdul-Hussein Abtan, during his visit to Doha, signed a protocol of cooperation with Qatar, given Iraq the right to host the 24th Arabian Gulf Cup.


World Bank Assists in Reconstructing Mosul’s Bridges, UAE Offers to Rebuild al-Nuri Mosque

On March 13, Albawaba News reported that Ali al-Baroodi, an activist in Mosul, tweeted messages about the reconstruction process of Mosul, including the rehabilitation of the ancient al-Nuri Mosque. The work to restore Mosul is going slowly. There are still ISIS mines and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) left behind. The United Arab Emirates is now putting forth a plan to reconstruct the al-Nuri Mosque and the al-Hadba Minaret. Baroodi said “The ancient Nuri mosque has a leaning minaret.” The Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) destroyed the Great al-Nuri Mosque in June 2017 just before the city was cleared of ISIS militants by Iraqi Security Forces. The mosque is also the site of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s declaration of the establishment of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham on June 29, 2014.

On March 18, The Times of London published a report about post-ISIS Mosul, according to which “Mosul is an apocalyptic scene,” still scattered with burnt cars, ruined houses and dead bodies. ISIS’s former capital is intensively booby-trapped, with mortar rounds and grenades still visible among the debris. Major General Felix Gedney, British Deputy Commander-Strategy and Support (S&S) Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, said that ISIS “seeded the ground with industrial levels of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) designed to kill or maim those returning or those clearing.” He added that IEDs were found in baby food as well as hidden in furniture and books. Pehr Lodhammar, Programme Director of the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) said his team has neutralized 27,000 IEDs so far and that they have found “hundreds” of IEDs factories with quality control departments and brandings. Additionally, the terrorists planted explosives in critical infrastructures, like hospitals and schools. It took six weeks to clear the 2,500 devices found in Al-Shifa hospital. According to Lodhammar, it will take ten years to clear Old Mosul and people will still find remnants 40 years from now. His team is also engaged in deactivating suicide belts found on ISIS militants bodies spread around the city. The local population seems to be shocked by the lack of international help in reconstructing ISIS-liberated areas, but western countries are reluctant to invest money in Iraq due to widespread corruption. Christina Lamb, the article’s author, stated that if the citizens cannot return home to a safe environment and earn a livelihood, there is the risk of them supporting the terrorists again instead of their government.

On March 18, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi met with Ambassadors of the European Union (EU), to discuss the EU’s contribution to Iraq’s reconstruction after defeating ISIS. Abadi said in a statement that Iraq and the EU are seeking ways to cooperate based on common interests without interference in international affairs. Abadi said he considered the Kuwait conference a success as the world has shown its commitment to support Iraq’s reconstruction. However, now Iraq is facing the challenges of enhancing the job markets and stimulating the private sectors.

On March 19, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) held a two-day workshop in Baghdad with 33 organizations seeking to create and design activities that will assist in the voluntary return of displaced Iraqis to Ninewa Province, and to encourage those who are already in their communities to stay. The United States Ambassador to Iraq Douglas Silliman stressed that “All Iraqi people suffered greatly during the cruel occupation by ISIS, and the United States is providing assistance to help displaced families return home, including to the Ninewa Plains and western Ninewa, two areas that exemplify Iraq’s unique cultural heritage and religious tolerance. We look forward to reviewing the innovative proposals that come out of this workshop.”

On March 19, a delegation from the World Bank headed by the World Bank Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa Region, Hafez Ghanem, met with Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. During the meeting, Abadi stressed the need to focus on providing job opportunities for Iraqi youth and reforming the banking system. He said, “What happened [during the Kuwait International Conference of Reconstruction of Iraq in February] is a global demonstration of confidence in Iraq,” and expressed his optimism in Iraq’s reconstruction. Ghanem confirmed “the confidence of the World Bank and the international community in Iraqi government and admiration for its economic policies that will lead to further economic growth,” noting that “the World Bank aims to work with the Iraqi government to increase growth in all provinces in Iraq and provide thousands of jobs for young people. “

On March 20, the World Bank Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa Region, Hafez Ghanem, first visited Mosul, and announced that the World Bank has been supporting the Government of Iraq in the rehabilitation of three vital bridges in Mosul, namely the Mosul al-Hadid first bridge, Mosul fourth bridge, and Al-Muthana second bridge. He said, “The World Bank, through its projects in Mosul, and in close coordination with GOI, aims to bring back hope, energize the economy by creating jobs, and promote social cohesion. The restoration of these bridges is a symbol of reconnecting what has been broken.” This collaboration between the World Bank and the federal Ministry of Housing, Reconstruction and Public Works on the restoration of the three bridges is part of a broader joint plan that will target 14 bridges in the liberated areas to be completed by 2020. This rehabilitation project is part of the overall Iraq Emergency Operation for Development Project (EODP) worth US$ 750 million.

On March 21, Ninewa Police Chief, Major General Najeem al-Jubouri declared that nine ISIS militants were arrested in Mosul. Jubouri pointed out that the police forces were able to make the arrest thanks to the cooperation of citizens, who called the police and led them to the terroristes.

On March 21, Saad al-Mutlabi, a member of the Baghdad Provincial Council, announced the opening of more than 80 percent of the capital’s closed roads on the side of Karkh and Rusafa. Mutlabi said that about 20 percent of the roads still remain closed, adding that the Baghdad Provincial Council is working on reopen all of them and remove the concrete barrier, except in the Green Zone.

On March 22, Marta Ruedas was designated as the Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, replacing Lise Grande who held the post since 2014. Ms. Ruedas already serves as the Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Resident Coordinator for Iraq, United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI). She was the Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator for Sudan since August 2015. Prior to this assignment, she was the UN Development Programme (UNDP) Country Director in Afghanistan (2014-2015), and Deputy Director of the UNDP Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (2011-2014). Ms. Ruedas previously served as the Deputy Special Coordinator and Resident Coordinator for Lebanon (2007-2010), Resident Coordinator for Bulgaria (2001-2003), and Resident Coordinator for Sao Tomé and Príncipe (1991-2001). Ms. Ruedas has additionally served with UNDP in Bolivia, Kyrgyzstan, the Republic of Georgia, Nepal, Mongolia and Mexico. Ms. Ruedas is a citizen of Spain. Effective coordination of humanitarian action in the field hinges upon humanitarian coordination leaders: the Humanitarian Coordinators (HCs) or Resident Coordinators (RCs). If international humanitarian assistance is required, the HC or RC is responsible for leading and coordinating the efforts of humanitarian organizations (both UN and non-UN) with a view to ensuring that they are principled, timely, effective and efficient, and contribute to longer-term recovery. At the field level, the HC/RC is responsible for designating Cluster Lead Agencies for all key humanitarian response sectors, including Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, United Nations Development Programme, International Maritime Organization, and others.


IED Incidents and Resulting Casualties

DateLocationDeathsInjuries
03/20/2018Jisr Diyala, 30 kilometers southeast of Baghdad10
03/20/2018Mahmudiyah, 32 kilometers south of Baghdad01
03/20/2018Mosul01
03/20/2018Albu Bali, 23 kilometers east of Ramadi11
03/19/2018Mahmudiyah, 32 kilometers south of Baghdad03
03/19/2018Hor Rajab, 22 kilometers south of Baghdad02
03/17/2018Jisr Diyala, 30 kilometers southeast of Baghdad02
03/16/2018Madain, 43 kilometers southeast of Baghdad02

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center.


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