ISHM: May 18 – 24, 2018

ISHM LOGO

Key Takeaways:

    • IHEC Announces Official Election Results – On May 18, Iraq’s Independent High Electoral Commission announced the official results of the nationwide Parliamentary elections held on May 12, confirming that influential Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr’s Sadrist Movement will seat the most Members of Parliament at 54, followed by Hadi al-Amiri’s Fatah Alliance at 47, and Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s Victory Alliance at 42. A governing coalition of 165 members of the 329-seat Parliament is necessary to elect a Prime Minister, Speaker of Parliament, and President of the Iraqi Republic. Sadr is well known for declaring it a holy duty of his followers to attack U.S. forces following the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq and leading the Mahdi Army in so doing. Sadr once had close ties to Iran, but strongly condemns Iranian influence (and U.S. influence) in Iraqi politics. Analysts have observed that Sadr’s victory signals a shift away from sectarianism, given the support his coalition garnered from not only his base, but also Sunni business leaders and liberals across the country. more…
    • Candidates, Parties File Challenges to Election Outcomes – On May 21, Iraq’s Independent High Electoral Commission announced that 33 of 1436 complaints of electoral impropriety were deemed credible and actionable, and led IHEC to cancel ballots cast at 103 polling stations in Anbar, Ninewa, Salah ad-Din, Baghdad, and Erbil Provinces. There were more than 53 thousand polling stations across Iraq on May 12. IHEC will stop accepting complaints or appeals on May 31. Complaints of disenfranchisement continue to be heard from internally displaced persons, especially in Ninewa Province, and from Arab and Turkmen factions in Kirkuk. more…
    • Negotiations Continue as Elected Coalitions Seek to Form New Government – High-level negotiations among leaders of the various political coalitions took place this week as agendas were compared and combined in pursuit of a governing coalition of at least 165 members of the 329-seat Iraqi Parliament. On May 24, leader of the Sadrist Movement, Moqtada al-Sadr, announced that “the coalition of the future government is near completion, within final touches,” and the result would be announced in a few days. Sadr hinted that the unannounced coalition is composed of Sunni, Shia, Arab, Kurdish, national, and sectarian people. Most experts have speculated that the negotiations could last for several months, though the May 12 election predicated a trend away from sectarian identity. The Sadrist Movement’s 54 seats can be predictably combined with Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s 42, but that still leaves the alliance only halfway to the goal of 165. more…
    • Washington Post: New Clues Suggest Baghdadi Still Alive – The Washington Post reported that ISIS leader and self-proclaimed Caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is thought to still be alive and maintaining control over ISIS strategy, aiming to preserve the terrorist organization’s ideology and an underground insurgency despite its loss of geographic territory. Baghdadi is likely to be living in ISIS-controlled territory in Syria. Examples of ISIS insurgency were present across Iraq this week as the U.S.-led international coalition conducted airstrikes on ISIS positions in Makhmur District, Erbil Province and federal police forces apprehended suspected ISIS affiliates in Wasit, Kirkuk, Mosul, and Hawija. On May 24, a suicide bomber detonated his explosive belt at the entrance to a park in al-Shuala District, approximately 15 kilometers northwest of Baghdad, killing at least two and injuring 17 others. Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Iraq, Jan Kubis, condemned the attack, adding that “all Iraqis must stand united in rejecting such heinous acts and in working together to consolidate their hard-won democracy.” more…

Please note: ISHM will not be published for the next three weeks due to vacation schedules and our transition to a new research team. We will return to our regular schedule on Thursday, June 14, 2018.

For more background on most of the institutions, key actors, political parties, and locations mentioned in our takeaways or in the stories that follow, see the ISHM Reference Guide.


IHEC Announces Official Election Results

On May 17, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the United States’ policy with respect to Iraq has not been changed as a result of the May 12 election that saw influential Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr’s political alliance win the most seats in Parliament. Sanders added that the most important thing for the U.S. now is to “accelerate the formation of the new Iraqi government,” noting that the ongoing meetings between U.S. officials and Iraqi parties emphasize their encouragement for the next government’s formation.

On May 18, the Iraq Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) announced the official results of the May 12 Parliamentary elections. The Sadrist Movement, led by influential Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, has won the most seats of the 329 seat legislature with 54 seats.The Fatah Alliance led by Hadi al-Amiri, who has close ties with Iran, came in second with 47 seats. The Victory Alliance, headed by incumbent Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, took third place with 42. Other ourcomes are as follows:

  • State of Law (Nouri al-Maliki), 26 seats
  • Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) (Masoud Barzani), 25 seats
  • al-Wataniya Movement (Ayad Allawi), 21 seats
  • National Wisdom Alliance (Ammar al-Hakim),19 seats
  • Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) (Kosrat Rasul Ali), 18 seats
  • Qarar al-Iraqi Coalition (Khamis Al-Khanjar), 14 seats
  • Gorran Movement (Omar Said Ali), 5 seats
  • New Generation Movement (Shaswar Abdulwahid), 4 seats
  • Kurdistan Islamic Group (Komal) (Ali Bapir), 2 seats
  • Coalition for Democracy and Justice (CDJ) (Barham Salih), 2 seats
  • Kurdistan Islamic Union (KIU), 2 seats
  • Other parties, 48

Six parties in the Kurdistan Region were considering withdrawing from the political process in Iraq after IHEC refused their requests to manually recount votes in Sulaimani Province due to fraud allegations made against the PUK. The six parties are Gorran Movement, CDJ, Komal, KIU, the Communist Party of Kurdistan, and the Kurdistan Islamic Movement (KIM).

On May 20, the New York Times commented on the upset victory of influential Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr in Iraq’s May 12 Parliamentary elections. Sadr was once branded as the “main enemy” of the United States in Iraq for declaring it “a holy duty among his Shia faithful to attack United States forces” following the 2003 U.S.-led invasion. The militia loyal to Sadr, the Mahdi Army, was armed with Iranian-supplied weapons, and Sadr cultivated a strong alliance with leaders in Tehran, who now seek to exclude American influence. More recently, Sadr has distanced himself from his former patrons in Iran, who he sees as a destabilizing force in Iraqi politics. The modern Sadrist Movement combines the cleric’s mostly working-class Shia base with Sunni business leaders, liberals and Iraqis looking for relief from the country’s long-simmering economic crisis. The victory of Sadr’s alliance means a  weakened sectarian foundation of Iraq’s political system, and has helped transform Sadr’s image from “the paragon of a militant Shia into an unexpected symbol of reform and Iraqi nationalism.”

On May 20, Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei’s advisor for foreign affairs, Ali Akbar Velayati, commented on the results of the Iraqi Parliamentary elections, “I am happy to see the elections in Iraq were held under ful stability and security.” He also added that, “the government and Iraqi people will not allow any interference about their internal affairs.” During his visit to Baghdad before the parliamentary elections, Velayati said his country would not allow liberals and communists to rule Iraq. The secretary of the Iraqi Communist Party and member of the Sadrist Movement responded to Velayati’s statements, which they considered as “interference with the Iraqi issue and contrary to the Iraqi constitution.”

On May 22, Reuters reported that the United States has contacted the leader of the Sadrist Movement, Moqtada al-Sadr, whose alliance won an influential role in forming the future government of Iraq. The victory of the Sadrist Movement came as a surprise to the U.S., as Sadr’s Mahdi Army militia fought violent battles against U.S. troops after Saddam Hussein was toppled in 2003. However, Washington and Sadr agree that Iranian influence in Iraq should be limited. “Tehran has skillfully manipulated Iraqi politics in its favour in the past, and may try to undermine Sadr’s attempts to shape a new government,” Dhiaa al-Asadi, a top aide to the cleric, told Reuters. “[Washington] asked what the position of the Sadrist Movement will be when they come to power. Are they going to reinvent or invoke the Mahdi Army or reemploy them? Are they going to attack American forces in Iraq?”

On May 22, the Director of the Office of Moqtada al-Sadr, Zia al-Asadi, denied reports of contact between Washington officials and members in their party. Asadi said that “some media attributed a statement to me to ensure that there are contacts between Washington and the members in Sadrist Movement, which is fake.” He added that, “there are no channels of communication with Americans. They sent mediators to us, but we refused to sit down and talk.”

On May 23, the U.S. Department of State confirmed that U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, Ambassador Brett McGurk, “is holding a series of meetings with parties in Baghdad and KRI.” Heather Nauert, Spokesperson for the Department, refused to provide details about McGurk’s meeting in Sulaimania with Kurdistan party leaders. Nauert also stressed that the U.S. would not pose influence on the formation of the future administration of Iraq, and “will work with the government and whichever party the people decided to choose, whether we would meet with Sadr or not.”


Candidates, Parties File Challenges to Election Outcomes

On May 19, Speaker of Parliament Salim al-Jabouri sent an official letter to the Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) after failing to muster a quorum of Parliament to discuss the results of the May 12 parliamentary election. Jabouri said in a statement that the letter includes “all means of confidence in the electoral process, sample re-counting, and referral of associated criminal cases to the competent authorities.” Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Iraq, Ján Kubiš, called on IHEC to conduct an immediate and full investigation into any and all complaints related to the electoral process.

On May 19, a source in the Parliament told Shafaaq, “the chances of holding a session in Parliament has significantly decreased,” as there is no sign of having enough Members of Parliament (MP) to support a session. On May 17, some MPs called an emergency session to discuss electoral violation allegations stemming from the May 12 Parliamentary elections.

On May 20, the leader of the Fatah Alliance in Kirkuk Province, Mohammed Mahdi al-Bayati, said that conservatives of the province “will not end” a sit-in demonstration without the formation of a neutral committee to audit the work of IHEC, while calling for the UN mission to intervene. According to Bayati, the neutral committee should be formed by Parliament, the Supreme Court, and the Ministry of Justice. He also called on Turkmen leader Anwar Bir Qaddar to acknowledge the protesters. Bayati suggested that the election result was rigged in favor of the National Union Party with complacency by the UNHCR. Thousands of Kirkuk citizens, Arabs and Turkmen are actively demonstrating in Kirkuk City, demanding a manual recount of the votes.

On May 21, IHEC announced that 33 of 1436 complaints were deemed credible and actionable following the May 12 parliamentary election, and canceled the ballots cast at 103 polling stations in Anbar, Ninewa, Salah al-Din, Baghdad and Erbil Provinces based on those 33 complaints. There were more than 53 thousand polling stations across Iraq on May 12. According to a statement from IHEC, the decision was made based on a 2007 law that gives IHEC the exclusive authority to settle complaints, including the authority to nullify ballots.

On May 21, IHEC imposed a fine on Iraqi Turkmen Front (ITK) member, Hassan Turan, for 50 million dinars (approximately US$ 42 thousand) for defamation and incitement against the Commission, alleging that they rigged or manipulated the results of the election. The deputy head of the ITF Hassan Turan said that the “imposition” of the fine is a result of exposing “fraud and violations” in Kirkuk. The office of the ITF claimed that “MP Hassan Turan was exercising his duty to monitor and protect the rights of voters,” adding that the “brothers of Turkman will continue the sit-in until the ballot in Kirkuk is opened and manually counted.” On May 17, Turan accused the PUK of rigging 600 of 1200 polling stations in the province. He said that the Arab protesters will accept any result after counting and sorting by hand.

On May 22, Alsumaria News reported that dozens of internally displaced people in camps in Ninewa Province demonstrated against IHEC, alleging that their votes were not counted by the commission. According to the protesters, they would continue to demonstrate until they could be assured their votes were included.

On May 24, IHEC announced that they will stop accepting complaints or appeals regarding the May 12 Parliamentary elections on May 31. IHEC has begun to receive complaints and appeals from candidates and their affiliated parties and alliances.


Negotiations Continue as Elected Coalitions Seek to Form New Government

On May 18, influential Shia cleric and leader of Sadrist Movement, Moqtada al-Sadr, met with the leader of National Wisdom Alliance, Ammar al-Hakim, in Najaf to discuss the first steps in forming a coalition to govern Iraq. After the meeting, Sadr said on Twitter that, “ the victory of Sadrist Movement is disturbing many, which might cause some trouble in the country. I ask you to pray for the light, and we are going to launch the reform and will never compromise.” Through his official account on Twitter, it appears that he would like to form a coalition with the the National Wisdom Alliance, while excluding the State of Law Coalition led by former Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan once led by former Iraqi President Jalal Talabani.

On May 20, Moqtada al-Sadr met with Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, notably within 24 hours of the announcement of the final results of the May 12 elections. The Sadrist Movement supports Abadi with its 54 seats, and combined with Abadi’s Victory Alliance, totals 96 seats of the 329 seat chamber. 165 seats are needed to form a governing coalition, and elect a Prime Minister, Parliament Speaker, and President of the Republic. Sadr said he hopes to form a coalition capable of tackling corruption problems, improving the deteriorating economy, and rebuilding Iraq after years of war. Abadi called a press conference after the meeting, announcing that, “the meeting with Sadr is about working together to accelerate the formation of a new government. The new government would be strong and will provide services and employment opportunities, improve the living standard, and fight corruption.”

On May 20, leader of Fatah Alliance, Hadi al-Amiri, said that he is discussions with the leaders of the State of Law Coalition, National Wisdom Alliance, al-Wataniya Movement, and the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) about the formation of the next government. According to a press release from the Fatah Alliance, Amiri has set up a series of meetings with the leaders from different coalitions to speed up the formation of a new government. The total number of seats in Parliament from these coalitions totals 138, 27 short of the number required to form a governing coalition.

On May 20, the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) have agreed to conduct a dialogue among all Kurdish parties and unite the ranks about the Iraqi Parliament elections held on May 12. A high-level delegation from the KDP, led by the party’s vice president, Nechirvan Barzani, met with a delegation from the PUK headed by Mullah Bakhtiar. “The Kurdistan Democratic Party and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan agree on the necessity of the participation of all Kurdish parties in one team to go to the Iraqi Parliament,” said the leader of the PUK, Harim Kamal Agha, adding that “preserving the gains requires a single Kurdish voice.”

On May 22, the leader of the Sadrist Movement, Moqtada al-Sadr, announced that the next federal government would resolve all differences and outstanding issues with the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). Sadr met with the Secretary-General of the KDP, Fadhil Mirani in Baghdad. Sadr’s Information Office made the statement stressing the importance of unity with the KRI. For the Kurdistan part, the delegation expressed the satisfaction about the meeting, and congratulated the victory of the Sadrist Movement. The Kurdistan delegation was set to meet with Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi; the leader of the Fatah Alliance, Hadi al-Amiri; the leader of the State of Law Coalition, Nouri al-Maliki; the leader of al-Wataniya, Ayad Allawi; and the leader of National Wisdom Alliance, Ammar al-Hakim, in the following days.

On May 22, the leader of State of Law Coalition, former Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki met with the delegation of the KDP in discussion about the current political development and the cooperation to form the future government. Maliki described the meeting as “good and important,” and the head of the KDP delegation, Fadhi Mirani, said, “We have reached the common points with Mr. Maliki,” referring to the formation of a new government. The delegation was headed by Fadhil Mirani, secretary of the KDP.

On May 23, the delegation of the KDP said that the results of its meeting with the leader of the National Wisdom Alliance Ammar al-Hakim was fruitful. Fadhil Mirani of the KDP said that “it is not a condition that the future Iraqi government consists of all components,” noting that “the most important in the formation of the next government is to rely on competencies.”

On May 23, the leader of Victory Alliance, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, met the delegation of the PUK headed by Mullah Bakhtiar in Baghdad. During the meeting, Abadi stressed the importance of speeding up the formation of the new government. While the PUK delegation stressed that they wanted be part of that future government.

On May 23, the leader of Wisdom Movement Alliance, Ammar al-Hakim, announced during a press conference held in Kuwait that “the formation of the coalition is going positively, and the Sadrist Movement has not only been the alliance of us today, but also for years.” He also stressed that they were devoted to remove Iraq from any regional or international influence, so “Iraq can be Iraqi.”

On May 24, the leader of Sadrist Movement, Moqtada al-Sadr announced that “the coalition of the future government is in completion within final touches,” and the result would be announced in a few days. Sadr stressed that “it was a genuine Iraqi government composed of Sunni, Shia, Arab, Kurdish, national, and sectarian people.”


Washington Post: New Clues Suggest Baghdadi Still Alive

On May 18, the U.S.-led international coalition conducted airstrikes against Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants in the Qara Jukh area, Makhmur District, approximately 70 kilometers south of Erbil. An Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga officer said that they had sent coordinates to the international coalition based on ISIS militant movements in the area. He added that according to the information they received, two of the militants died after the airstrike and others were wounded.

On May 18, the Security Information Center announced the arrest of four ISIS militants in Tall Kayf, approximately 20 kilometers north of Mosul in Ninewa Province. The Security Information Center released a statement saying that “the Tall Kayf Police Directorate, under the command of the Ninewa Police, arrested four members of [ISIS], in accordance with the Article 4/1 for terrorism in the area of Khalidiya in Anbar Province.” The statement noted that “they were arrested in the area of Tall Kayf, north of the city of Mosul”, adding that “the detainees admitted committing several crimes against innocent citizens and members of the security forces during the [ISIS] period.”

On May 18, the Security Information Center confirmed the arrest of a terrorist in Wasit Province. Brigadier General Yahya Rasool, spokesman for the Security Information Center, said in a statement that “the detachment of the Military Intelligence Directorate in the al-Rafidain Operations Command, with accurate intelligence information and in cooperation with the Wasit Counterterrorism, arrested a terrorist in the Numaniyah District in Wasit Province.” Rasool added that the suspect was wanted for terrorism under Article 4/1.

On May 19, an anonymous source in the Kirkuk Police said that two men were arrested on charges of terrorism. The source said that “the federal police forces were able to arrest the suspects who were issued an arrest warrant under the Article 4/1 for terrorism, in the village of Briyma, southwest of Kirkuk.” The source added that the police forces conducted other security operations in the area and inspected several villages to secure the region.

On May 19, The Washington Post published an article according to which ISIS leader and self-proclaimed Caliph, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, is thought to still be alive and maintaining control over ISIS strategy. The article claims that during a meeting held in mid-2017 in Deir al-Zour, approximately 500 kilometers northeast of Damascus, Baghdadi discussed with other ISIS leaders preserving the organization’s ideological core, despite the fall of the caliphate. Despite his prolonged absence and claims that he was dead or gravely injured, United States (U.S.) counterterrorism officials are convinced that Baghdadi is still alive and directing ISIS strategy. The authors claim that this view is supported by intelligence intercepts and detainee interrogations, as well as writings and statements obtained by operatives in the terrorist organization’s network. Experts also say that reports seemed to suggest that Baghdadi’s strategy has shifted to crafting an ideological frame that would survive the physical destruction of ISIS. Operatives in the organization confirmed that Baghdadi and other leaders decided to prioritize the indoctrination of children and recruits, and that this strategy gained urgency as the caliphate crumbled. An operative who spoke with The Washington Post in condition of anonymity, said that “the leadership is convinced that, even if the State has disappeared, as long as they can influence the next generation through education, the idea of the caliphate will endure.” Additionally, Baghdadi was allegedly behind a number of missives in recent months which allude to a change from caliphate to “underground insurgency and international terrorist movement.” Nicholas Rasmussen, former director of the U.S. National Counterterrorism Center said that “even as they were losing Mosul and Raqqa, we were seeing indications that they were planning to operate anew, as a clandestine organization,” noting that “as they were being driven out of these places, they were leaving behind a kind of cell structure.” According to U.S. officials, Baghdadi would be in Syria, in one of the areas that are still under ISIS control. They also believe that after Kurdish forces had to defend themselves against Turkish attacks in different parts of Syria, they abandoned their offensive to liberate terrorist-held villages in eastern Syria, and created a lull which allowed the ISIS militants to refortify their positions and bring in supplies and reinforcements. An anonymous U.S. counterterrorism official said that “they [ISIS forces] have definitely regrouped”, adding that “the pause gave them an opportunity to do that.” Concerning Baghdadi’s absence, some experts saw it as part of the group’s strategy to de-emphasize the importance of individual leaders, but it has also stirred controversy within the organization, especially during a crucial struggle for its survival. Steven Stalinsky, executive director of the Middle East Media Research Institute, said that “this clearly affects the morale of ISIS and its supporters.” Other militants responded to the criticism by renewing their oath of allegiance to their leader, which Stalinsky thinks is an “indication that he is, or was, facing challenges to his authority from within.”

On May 20, an anonymous source revealed that five ISIS militants were killed during an ambush to Popular Mobilization United (PMU) elements. The source said that the ambush took place in the Rashad District, approximately 46 kilometers southwest of the city of Kirkuk, in Kirkuk Province, adding that the PMUs fighters went to the area after receiving intelligence information concerning ISIS militants infiltrating in villages in southwest Kirkuk Province.

On May 20, the Security Information Center released a statement concerning the destruction of three additives for ISIS and the deactivation of 19 explosive devices in Anbar Province. The statement read that “the Jazira Operations Command carried out a search that included the areas of Umm al-Wahush, Umm Samawi, Tamiyshan, Khunaifis, which resulted in the destruction of three additives of the [ISIS] terrorist group, and it treated 19 explosive devices.” The statement added that the Jazira Operations Command found hree homemade improvised explosive devices filled with C4 material which were detonated on site.

On May 20, an anonymous source reported that Ali Mahdi, the director of the Baghdad al-Jadeeda District, approximately 16 kilometers east of Baghdad, was wounded in an armed attack. The source said that “unknown gunmen opened fire this afternoon towards the director of the Baghdad al-Jadeeda District, Ali Mahdi, as he left his home in the mentioned area (east of Baghdad), which resulted in serious injuries.”

On May 21, Yahya Rasool, spokesman for the Security Information Center, confirmed that more than 10 ISIS militants were killed. Rasool said that “within the framework of searching and inspecting for [ISIS] sanctuaries, with accurate intelligence, the 20th Division of the Military Intelligence Directorate managed to reach one of the large and important tunnels of these gangs in the Husseiniya area in central Mosul, and they clashed with them, killing two terrorists and they seized explosive belts and food supplies.” Rasool added that “because of the length of the tunnel and the presence of many branches and ramifications that hinder the process of clearance, and the presence of a number of terrorists inside, we coordinated with the Coalition’s aircrafts for an airstrike, which destroyed the tunnel and killed the terrorists inside, estimated to be more than ten. They were a sleeper cell planning to carrying out terrorist operations in the coming days.”

On May 22, according to an anonymous source, Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) arrested Abu Wahab al-Iraqi, the ISIS official responsible for the terrorist organization’s executions, in the Hawija District, Kirkuk Province. The source said that “based on accurate intelligence information, [ISF] arrested the official responsible for [ISIS] executions, called Abu Wahab al-Iraqi. A quality operation carried out by [ISF] at night led to his arrest and [the arrest of] four of his companions who were with him in a house in the area of Zab, Hawija District.” The source pointed out that “the terrorist Abu Wahab al-Iraqi is involved in many murders, kidnappings and the installation of fake checkpoints in the Hawija District, where he was found with his maps and plans for the targets that these gangs attack.”

On May 23, the Iraqi Ministry of the Interior warned that a controlled explosion of ISIS remnants took place in northern Baghdad and denied the occurrence of incidents in the Abu Ghraib District, approximately 30 kilometers west of Baghdad. Major General Saad Maan, spokesman for the Ministry of the Interior, said that “what happened just a few days ago was a controlled explosion of a number of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), remnants of [ISIS] in northern Baghdad”, adding that “there was no incident within the Abu Ghraib District.”

On May 24, a suicide bomber detonated his explosive belt at the entrance of a park in Al-Shuala District, 15 kilometers northwest of Baghdad. An anonymous security source reported that “the police helped prevent the suicide bomber from entering the park.”  The source added that “the explosion killed two people, including an officer with the rank of lieutenant in the Ghazaliya Intelligence, and wounded 17 others, causing physical damage to a number of cars and shops nearby.”

On May 24, Jan Kubis, Special Representative for the United Nations (U.N.) Secretary-General for Iraq, condemned the suicide attack that killed two people and injured 17 others in Al-Shuala District, 15 kilometers northwest of Baghdad. Kubis said that “this attack which targeted innocent civilians is the work of cowards who have no respect for human life and for the Holy Month of Ramadan,” adding that “all Iraqi must stand united in rejecting such heinous acts and in working together to consolidate their hard-won democracy.” Kubis expressed his condolences saying that “my condolences go to the families of the deceased and my warm wishes for a speedy recovery to the injured.”


IED Incidents and Resulting Casualties

DateLocationDeathsInjuries
05/24/2018Al-Shuala, 16 kilometers northwest of Baghdad217
05/23/2018Abu Ghraib, 31 kilometers west of Baghdad03
05/21/2018Tarmiyah, 56 kilometers north of Baghdad10
05/21/2018Qa'im, 261 kilometers northwest of Ramadi13
05/20/2018Baiji, 120 kilometers west of Kirkuk01
05/20/2018Yusufiya, 38 kilometers southwest of Baghdad03
05/19/2018Mosul04
05/18/2018Talbiyah, 12 kilometers northeast of Baghdad02
05/18/2018Khanaqin, 188 kilometers northeast of Baghdad11
05/18/2018Daquq, 57 kilometers south of Kirkuk10
05/18/2018Hor Rajab, 22 kilometers south of Baghdad03

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center.


Subscribe to our weekly ISHM and have the latest developments in Iraq sent straight to your inbox every Thursday and follow EPIC on Twitter to receive updates throughout the week.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email