ISHM: December 14 – December 20, 2018

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Key Takeaways:

  • Three of the eight remaining cabinet ministers confirmed, as political wrangling continues over appointment of the rest; Agreement reached between Anbar tribal leaders on post-ISIS justice – On December 14, supporters of Muqtada al-Sadr protested in Baghdad demanding the completion of the Iraqi Cabinet. On December 18, the Iraqi Council of Representatives confirmed three of the eight remaining ministers for the cabinet of Iraq – the ministers of higher education, culture and planning. On December 18, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi announced that he expects the Council of Ministers to finalize the government and approve the nomination of the remaining ministers of his Cabinet on Thursday. In a weekly press conference, PM Madhi stated “if I am authorized by the political blocs to submit new names to fill the positions of the remaining ministries, I will do so.” On December 18, Falih al-Fayadh, the former National Security Adviser under PM Haider al-Abadi, resumed his duties under current PM Adel Abdul Mahdi. Former PM Abadi decided to relieve Fayadh of his duties in late August, citing concerns he was involved in “political and partisan work.” On December 19, Sanad for Peacebuilding, an Iraqi-based nongovernmental organization (NGO), announced that tribal leaders in Anbar Province agreed to new principles and amendments to the 2016 People’s Covenant of Anbar. more…
  • Iraq receives another extension from the U.S. to continue importing Iranian energy products; New deals reached on oil drilling and seismic surveys in Basra – On December 20, an anonymous Iraqi government official told Shafaaq News that the White House extended, for the second time, Iraq’s exemption to allow import of Iranian gas and electricity for a 90-day period. On December 19, the Iraqi Ministry of Oil announced it struck a deal with American company Schlumberger to drill 40 oil wells in the Majnoon oilfield located in Basra Province. Another deal between the Basra Oil Company and Oil Exploration Co. (two state-run firms), was struck to conduct seismic surveys at the Majnoon oilfield. more…
  • Iraqi officials meet foreign counterparts, welcome new UNAMI special representative – On December 17, the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) welcomed the newly appointed Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the United Nations in Iraq, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, for assuming her role as head of UNAMI. On the same day, Hennis-Plasschaert met with Iraqi Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohamed Ali al-Hakim. The next day Hennis-Plasschaert met Iraqi PM Adel Abdul Mahdi. On December 19, Iraqi President Barham Salih met Hennis-Plasschaert as well. On December 20, Hennis-Plasschaert met former Iraqi PM Haider al-Abadi. On December 17, Iraqi PM Adel Abdul Mahdi met with the Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee in the European Union (EU) Parliament, David McAllister. The next day, McAllister met with the head of the Fatah Alliance, Hadi al-Amiri. On December 18, Iraqi Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mohamed Ali al-Hakim, met with the U.S. Special Envoy for Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, Brett McGurk. On December 19, Iraqi PM Adel Abdul Mahdi met with Australian PM Scott Morrison in Baghdad.  more…
  • Turkey continues to bomb northern Iraq despite Iraqi demarche; Iraq reaches counter-terrorism cooperation agreement with Hungary – On December 14, the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs met with the Turkish Ambassador to file an official complaint against Turkey over recent airstrikes in Iraq’s borders. On December 15, the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated it would continue its airstrike campaign in Northern Iraq against members of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK). The Turkish ministry reported it killed eight members of the PKK on Friday. On December 17, Alsumaria News reported that the counter-terrorism agency in Iraq signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Hungary. more…
  • Humanitarian organizations continue assisting flood victims; UNDP launches project surveying damage in Mosul – On December 12, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) released a situation report regarding the recent flooding that has affected many areas of Iraq over the past 3 weeks. On December 16, the Iraqi Red Crescent Society (IRCS) announced the distribution of food and relief aid to more than 100 families in Al-Tawafa located in eastern Mosul City affected by recent flooding in the area. On December 19, Al-Menasa reported that the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), launched assessment efforts to gather information on the extent of damages done in Mosul.
    more…
  • Amnesty International documents destruction of agriculture in Sinjar as Nadia Murad pledges her Nobel Prize award to support healthcare in Sinjar; UNICEF issues new survey on the state of education in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq – On December 13, Amnesty International released a report documenting the devastation wrought by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) on agricultural production in Sinjar. On December 17, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nadia Murad announced she would use her prize money to help build a hospital in Sinjar. On December 17, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) released a report documenting an improvement in the number of children who are attending school in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). According to UNICEF, 96% of children in the KRI are attending primary school, while 67% are attending lower secondary education. more…
  • Foreign donors pledge support for demining, health services and mental health care in areas liberated from ISIS in Iraq – On December 14, the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) announced that the Danish federal government allocated DKK $19.5 million (USD $3 million) for the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) to assist with explosive threat mitigation efforts in areas of Iraq liberated from ISIS. On December 17, the European Union (EU) Trust Fund announced funding provided to many countries worth EUR $122 million (USD $138.7 million) to support initiatives related to education, health services and refugee improvements. The main recipients would be Jordan, Turkey, and Iraq. On December 17, the Norwegian Government contributed NOK $15 million (USD $ 1.7 million) to UNMAS to help support explosive hazards management activities in areas of Iraq that have been liberated from ISIS. On December 18, the Italian government contributed USD $1.1 million to the World Health Organization (WHO) to support physical and mental health rehabilitation services in Ninewa Province. On December 19, Italy contributed an additional EUR $585,000 (USD $668,00) to (UNMAS in Iraq to help mitigate the threat posed by explosive efforts and to restabilize areas liberated from ISIS. more…

For more background on most of the institutions, key actors, political parties, and locations mentioned in our takeaways or in the stories that follow, see the ISHM Reference Guide.


Three of the eight remaining cabinet ministers confirmed, as political wrangling continues over appointment of the rest; Agreement reached between Anbar tribal leaders on post-ISIS justice

On December 13, Rudaw News reported on the public sparring between former Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Haider al-Abadi and current PM Adel Abdul Mahdi over recent decisions made by Mahdi’s Administration to repeal certain legal decisions made by Abadi while in office. On December 11, it was reported that official decisions made by Abadi’s government between July 1 and October 24 would be repealed. However, PM Mahdi denied these abrogations as Abadi accused Mahdi of going against the interests of the people. Abadi also accused Mahdi of making political decisions “based on narrow interests.” This development comes as members of Abadi’s Victory Alliance in Parliament have publicly denounced and blocked several of Mahdi’s nominations to fill key ministerial positions, including for the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Defense.

On December 14, protesters gathered in Baghdad to demand the completion of the Iraqi Cabinet. Many demonstrators were supporters of Muqtada al-Sadr, the leader of the Sairoon Alliance. PM Mahdi denied any responsibility for the delay in appointing a cabinet, arguing that it is not in his power to resolve any of the disputes, while MPs called on PM Mahdi to nominate different ministers who are not subject to external influence, especially Iran. Rudaw also reported that several protests in Basra Province in southern Iraq continued on Friday as demonstrators demanded the provincial council elect a new governor. Many demonstrators gathered outside the entrance of the Basra provincial council building, which prevented 35 staff members from leaving.

On December 18, the Iraqi Council of Representatives confirmed three of the eight remaining Ministers for the Cabinet of Iraq. The Council of Representatives voted to confirm Qusay al-Suhail as Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research, Abdul Ameer al-Hamdani for Minister of Culture, and Nuri al-Dulaimi for Minister of Planning. Lawmakers expect the new ministers to take oath of service on Thursday. The candidates for the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Migration and Displacement, both of them women, failed to secure enough votes to pass confirmation. According to Kurdistan24, many political blocs still heavily opposed the nominations for the Ministry of the Interior, the Ministry of Defense, and the Ministry of Justice.

On December 18, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi announced that he expects the Council of Ministers to finalize the government and approve the nomination of the remaining ministers of his Cabinet on Thursday. In a weekly press conference, PM Madhi stated “if I am authorized by the political blocs to submit new names to fill the positions of the remaining ministries, I will do so.”

On December 18, the Associated Press reported that Falih al-Fayadh, the former National Security Adviser under Prime Minister (PM) Haider al-Abadi, resumed his duties under current PM Adel Abdul Mahdi. Falih al-Fayadh is the chairman of the Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs), which is a group of militias funded by Iran. The move comes after Kurdistan24 reported that the Iraqi federal court ruled on December 17 that Fayadh could return to his duties as national security adviser. Former PM Abadi decided to relieve Fayadh of his duties in late August, citing concerns he was involved in “political and partisan work”, actions he deemed “run counter to the sensitive security tasks entrusted in him.”

On December 19, Sanad for Peacebuilding, an Iraqi-based nongovernmental organization (NGO), announced that tribal leaders in Anbar Province agreed to new principles and amendments to the 2016 People’s Covenant of Anbar. According to Sanad’s press release, the participants agreed on the “rejection of collective punishment against families of suspected ISIS members and supporters, commitment to identifying ISIS members through legal channels, support for security services in achieving stability, rejection of extremist and sectarian discourse, and the establishment of mechanisms and activities aimed at ensuring the sustainability of the agreement.” The agreements was reached as part of a 14-month long process involving more than 140 tribal leaders and community leaders.


Iraq receives another extension from the U.S. to continue importing Iranian energy products; New deals reached on oil drilling and seismic surveys in Basra

On December 19, the Iraqi Ministry of Oil announced it struck a deal with American company Schlumberger to drill 40 oil wells in the Majnoon oilfield located in Basra Province. Oil Minister Thamir Ghadhban made the announcement as another deal between the Basra Oil Company and Oil Exploration Co. (two state-run firms), was struck to conduct additional seismic surveys at the Majnoon oilfield. Ghadhban stated that “carrying out a three-dimensional seismic survey by the Oil Exploration Company in Majnoon will help to obtain accurate data and boost production at the field.” Reuters states that the output of oil from Majnoon is more than 240,000 barrels per day (bpd).

On December 20, an anonymous Iraqi government official told Shafaaq News that the White House extended Iraq’s exemption to allow import of Iranian gas and electricity for another 90-day period. Earlier, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi had sent a delegation to Washington, D.C. to negotiate an extension as the 45-day deadline previously granted to Iraq, which was set to expire on December 20.


Iraqi officials meet foreign counterparts, welcome new UNAMI special representative

On December 17, the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) released a statement congratulating newly appointed Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the United Nations in Iraq, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, for assuming her role as head of UNAMI. Plasschaert is a Dutch diplomat who brings 20 years of experience to the job and previously served as the Minister of Defense for the Netherlands from 2012 to 2017. Plasschaert will succeed previous Special Representative Jan Kubis, who held the post for the previous four years. On the same day,  Hennis-Plasschaert met with Iraqi Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohamed Ali al-Hakim. The next day, December 18, Hennis-Plasschaert met Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi. On December 19, Iraqi President Barham Salih met Hennis-Plasschaert as well. On December 20, Hennis-Plasschaert met former Iraqi PM Haider al-Abadi.

On December 17, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi met with the Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee in the European Union (EU) Parliament, David McAllister. The PM Media Office wrote on Twitter that “[PM] Adel Abdul Mahdi receives the chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament, David McAllister and his entourage, stressing the importance of developing relations between Iraq and the European countries and supporting cooperation between the Iraqi Parliament and the EU Parliament to serve common interests.”

On December 18, head of the Fatah Alliance, Hadi al-Amiri, met with the chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament, David McAllister. According to Alsumaria News, “Amiri stressed the need to strengthen relations with the EU countries and called on EU countries to participate in the reconstruction and assistance of Iraq.”

On December 18, Iraqi President Barham Salih met with the German Minister of Foreign Affairs, Heiko Maas. According to Alsumaria News Salih expressed “Iraq’s desire to develop relations with Germany, stressing the need for bilateral coordination between Iraq and the European Union to ease tensions in the region and to support Iraq in reconstruction and stability.”

On December 18, Prime Minister (PM) of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), Nechirvan Barzani, met with the German Minister of Foreign Affairs, Heiko Maas. The two held a joint press conference as PM Barzani thanked Germany for its military support and training and assisting in reform processes for the Kurdish armed forces. Minister Maas confirmed his country’s commitment to the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI) and hoped that Kurdistan and Germany would extend and develop diplomatic ties.

On December 18, Iraqi Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mohamed Ali al-Hakim, met with the United States (U.S.) Special Envoy for Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, Brett McGurk. According to Alsumaria News, the two discussed “recent developments in the fight against [ISIS] and the efforts of the international coalition, especially in the regions of western Iraq and the border with Syria.” Hakim urged McGurk and the U.S. to continue to support in reconstruction efforts by investing in Iraq. McGurk congratulated Hakim on his appointment as foreign minister and affirmed the U.S.’s commitment in helping Iraq moving forward.

On December 18, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi met with the Special Advisor to the Japanese PM, Kentaro Sonoura. Rudaw News reports that Mahdi offered a deal to create an investment fund of Iraqi oil exports to Japan in exchange for investments in the reconstruction of Iraq and other projects.

On December 19, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi met with Australian PM Scott Morrison in Baghdad. During the meeting, Mahdi urged Australian-based companies to invest in the reconstruction efforts post-ISIS and to help create jobs for Iraqi citizens. Mahdi affirmed Iraq’s positive relations with Australia and urged the two nations to  bolster their ties and cooperation in the future. In a joint-press conference, Scott Morrison praised “the victory of the Iraqi people [over ISIS] and the vision of [PM Mahdi] in the reconstruction, unification, and development of Iraq and the government’s efforts to develop the economy and provide employment opportunities.” Morrison affirmed Australia’s commitment in helping Iraq moving forward.  

On December 18, the Dutch Minister of Foreign Affairs, Stef Blok, met with Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) Prime Minister (PM) Nechirvan Barzani in Erbil. Blok affirmed his country’s continued commitment moving forward training Peshmerga forces and developing stronger ties with the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). These statements came during a joint press conference between PM Barzani and Minister Blok. Barzani also urged the Netherlands to support efforts to develop the region’s agricultural production, stating that “we also call on [the Netherlands] to help us develop the fields of food and agriculture as it has considerable expertise in these.”


Turkey continues to bomb northern Iraq despite Iraqi demarche; Iraq reaches counter-terrorism cooperation agreement with Hungary

On December 14, the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs met with the Turkish Ambassador to file an official complaint against Turkey over recent airstrikes in Iraq’s borders. A statement from the Iraqi Foreign Ministry read, “the ministry condemns the violation of Iraqi airspace by Turkish aircraft and the targeting of several sites in Mount Sinjar and Makhmour in northern Iraq, which resulted in the loss of lives and property. Such acts violate the sovereignty of Iraq and its security and people and are contrary to the principle of good-neighbourliness.” The meeting came after Turkish airstrikes targeted members of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) in northern Iraq, killing several civilians in Makhmour.

On December 15, the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated it would continue its airstrike campaign in Northern Iraq against members of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK). The Turkish ministry reported it killed eight members of the PKK on Friday. The strikes against the PKK have been ongoing for years as Turkey argues the mountainous region of Northern Iraq has been used by members of the PKK to mount insurgency attacks. Turkish Foreign Ministry Spokesman Hami Aksoy stated that “the activities of the PKK terrorist organization in the territory of Iraq and Syria have become a national security issue for Tukey,” and that “these operations in the fight against terrorism will continue as long as terror organizations nest on Iraqi soil and as long as Turkey’s security needs require it to.”

On December 17, Alsumaria News reported that the counter-terrorism agency in Iraq signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Hungary.  According to the report, a statement read that “Iraq signed with the Republic of Hungary a [MoU] of cooperation in the fields of combating terrorism, to share intelligence and build joint capabilities, strategic communication and coordination in the face of terrorist groups between the Iraqi counter terrorism service and the anti-terrorism center of the Republic of Hungary.”


Humanitarian organizations continue assisting flood victims; UNDP launches project surveying damage in Mosul

On December 12, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) released a situation report regarding the recent flooding that has affected many areas of Iraq over the past 3 weeks. Torrential rainfall has impacted many internally displaced persons (IDPs) camps in parts of Ninewa, Salah ad-Din, Kirkuk, Dahuk, and Diyala provinces. OCHA urged more rapid response efforts, especially in Ninewa province where the majority of IDP camps have been built on or near floodplains. The OCHA says that mitigation and rehabilitation efforts should become the priority of humanitarian efforts moving forward. This would include tent replacement and repairs, upgrades to water and sanitation for health (WASH) facilities and improvements to roads within IDP camps.

On December 16, the Iraqi Red Crescent Society (IRCS) announced the distribution of food and relief aid to more than 100 families in Al-Tawafa located in eastern Mosul City affected by recent flooding in the area. On December 17, the Iraqi Red Crescent Society (IRCS) provided an update on its efforts providing relief to families affected by floods in Salah ad-Din Province. According to the IRCS, their teams “distributed 430 health sets for the displaced families who are living in the Qeba ‘a school in [Salah ad-Din], the teams have conducted an assessment of the needs of the displaced families and they find out that they are in desperate need for health aid.” The IRCS also held several lectures through a health awareness program which teaches families how to prevent the risks of transitional diseases.

On December 19, Al-Menasa reported that the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), launched assessment efforts to gather information on the extent of damages done in Mosul. Engineers and sociologists are using drones to hover over the city of Mosul to collect data on what is needed to restore the city of Mosul to its former glory. UNDP’s project aims to reconstruct more than 10,000 damages houses in western Mosul with the help from international donors. The United Nations (UN) currently estimates that the final weeks to liberate Mosul in late-2016 through mid-2017, destroyed more than 5,000 buildings with more than 9,500 damaged since 2014. 85% of these destroyed or damaged buildings are residential units while the International Organization for Migration (IOM) estimates that 800,000 people are considered homeless with more than 50% of Mosul’s population either living in internally displaced persons (IDPs) camps or in emergency-type settings.


Amnesty International documents destruction of agriculture in Sinjar as Nadia Murad pledges her Nobel Prize award to support healthcare in Sinjar; UNICEF issues new survey on the state of education in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq

On December 13, Amnesty International released a report documenting the devastation wrought by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) in rural areas of northern Iraq, including Sinjar district where the majority of the Yazidi population lived before 2014. The report documented ISIS’ systematic destruction and mining of agricultural land land and irrigation systems. ISIS militants used oil and rubble to destroy wells, cables, generators, transformers, and pumps and also burned orchards and stole electricity lines. Amnesty estimates that since 2014, only 20% of Iraqi farmers have access to irrigation and nearly 75% of livestock was lost, with some areas witnessing a loss rate as high as 95%. Amnesty International urges the Iraqi federal government to adhere to its reconstruction plan outlined earlier in 2018.

On December 17, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nadia Murad announced she would use her prize money to help build a hospital in Sinjar, Iraq. Murad, a Yazidi survivor of war crimes committed by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), stated that “with the money I got from the Nobel Peace Prize, I will build a hospital in Sinjar to treat ill people, mainly widows and women who were exposed to sexual abuses by Islamic State militants.” Murad welcomed the Iraqi federal government and the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) for accepting her plan and stated she would recruit humanitarian organizations to assist in construction efforts.

On December 17, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) released a report documenting an improvement in the number of children who are attending school in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). According to UNICEF, 96% of children in the KRI are attending primary school, while 67% are attending lower secondary education. The completion rate of lower secondary education for children in poverty stands at merely 37%. UNICEF Representative in Iraq, Peter Hawkins, stated that “economic hardship, insufficient schools in rural areas and lack of transportation are just some of the factors that are keeping children from disadvantaged backgrounds from receiving an education that can transform their lives and that of their communities.” Hawkins warned that failure to address impoverished communities by investing heavily in education efforts will have a very negative impact for the prosperity of the KRI.


Foreign donors pledge support for demining, health services and mental health care in areas liberated from ISIS in Iraq

On December 14, the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) announced that the Danish federal government allocated DKK $19.5 million (USD $3 million) for the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) to assist with explosive threat mitigation efforts in areas of Iraq liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). Danish Minister of Foreign Affairs, Anders Samuelsen, stated that “we are painfully aware that the return of internally displaced persons to some kind of normal life is not possible as long as explosive hazards threaten their life and safety. That is why UNMAS’ work remains so critical.”

On December 17, the European Union (EU) Trust Fund announced funding provided to many countries worth EUR $122 million (USD $138.7 million) to support initiatives related to education, health services and refugee improvements. The main recipients would be Jordan, Turkey, and Iraq. The EU announced Iraq would receive EUR $9.5 million (USD $10.8 million) to assist with providing critical health care services to mothers and children while also improving prosperous livelihoods through cultural heritage development initiatives.

On December 17, the Norwegian Government contributed NOK $15 million (USD $ 1.7 million) to the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) to help support explosive hazards management activities in areas of Iraq that have been liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). The Norwegian Ambassador to Iraq, Tone Allers, stated that “Norway is pleased to support UNMAS’s important work in Iraq. We hope our contribution will enable humanitarian and stabilization interventions in areas liberate from the Islamic State in Iraq and [al-Sham (ISIS)]. The safe return of internally displaced people (IDPs) to their areas of origin is crucial. We also hope that UNMAS’ activities will strengthen coordination of efforts to clear landmines and other explosive hazards.”

On December 18, the Italian government contributed USD $1.1 million to the World Health Organization (WHO) to support physical and mental health rehabilitation services in Ninewa Province. The new contributions will also be used to ensure access to decent health-care is provided for physically disabled war victims and those suffering from mental illness. Adham Ismail, the Acting WHO Representative in Iraq, stated that “WHO appreciates the generous donation from the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation; it will certainly contribute to building on the good results achieved by WHO and partners in providing mental and physical rehabilitation services in Mosul.”

On December 19, Italy contributed an additional EUR $585,000 (USD $668,00) to the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) in Iraq to help mitigate the threat posed by explosive efforts and to re stabilize areas liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). Pehr Lodhammer, the UNMAS Iraq Senior Programme Manager stated that “the presence of explosive hazards significantly impedes the safe, sustainable, voluntary, and dignified return of internally displaced persons to their areas of origin in Iraq. Italy is a critical cooperative partner for UNMAS humanitarian and stabilization efforts to ensure the return of livelihoods and a sense of normalcy to affected communities.”

On December 20, the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) recognized the efforts of the Iraqi Ministry of the Interior to work alongside UNMAS to provide Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD), Improvised Explosive Device Defeat (IEDD), and Explosive Hazards First Responder (EHFR) training with assistance from Germany and the Czech Republic. The Ministry of the Interior created training sessions designed to train female police officers with the intention to hold more sessions in the future. Germany has contributed EUR $4 million (USD $ 4.5 million) to support enhancement training efforts in Anbar, Ninewa, and Kirkuk provinces. The Czech Republic has also contributed CZK $5 million (USD $215,000) to contribute to bolstering training in explosive hazards management for both men and women.


IED Incidents and Resulting Casualties

DateLocationDeathsInjuries
12/16/2018Basra 21
12/15/2018Ramadi , 120 kilometers west of Baghdad30
12/15/2018Ramadi , 120 kilometers west of Baghdad10

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center.


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