ISHM: August 12 – 18, 2016

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Key Takeaways:

  • Over the past week, Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga forces were involved in successful “widespread” operations to clear ISIS militants from areas north, east, and southeast of Mosul while Iraqi Security Forces continued efforts to clear the key area of Qayyarah, south of Mosul, where there is a heavy concentration of ISIS militants. U.S.-led international coalition airstrikes made significant progress in destroying ISIS convoys between Mosul and Qayyarah and in targeting ISIS operational centers in Mosul itself.
  • Gains made by Iraqi Security Forces, Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, and their allies in the lead-up to reclaim Mosul are progressing far more quickly than efforts to respond to the humanitarian needs of those displaced by the campaign. As IDPs are expected to overwhelm already crowded camps, the UNHCR began positioning 10,000 emergency shelter kits around the Ninewa Province in anticipation of future displacements. The Ministry of Displacement and Migration announced a list of areas planned to house and provide relief for future displacements two days before Amnesty International released an alarming report detailing the critical humanitarian conditions in congested camps at Debaga and in Anbar Province. Making matters worse, ISIS militants fired rockets and mortars into an IDP camp near Baiji, 50 kilometers north of Tikrit, killing 12 and wounding 20 in the process.
  • While a lack of adequate shelter space, water, and other resources in many IDP camps has become apparent, IDPs have been encouraged to return to their homes in Ramadi, Hit, and elsewhere in the Anbar Province. The Baghdad Provincial Council announced that they will reclaim schools currently housing IDPs from Fallujah by September 1. Despite these calls to return to their homes, the locations are not yet secure enough to receive them as evidenced by an assassination attempt on the Mayor of Ramadi in that town in broad daylight and intensified fighting in areas surrounding Hit and Ramadi. Head of the District Council of Hit Mohammad al-Hiti suggested that families displaced are hesitant to return for fear of “disrupting their children’s schooling,” not because of the airstrikes and sporadic ISIS attacks surrounding the city. The restoration of water and electricity, and the fortification of cities against recurring ISIS attacks are essential elements that need to be in place before accepting returnees.
  • In a reversal of recent trends, the Iraqi Parliament swiftly approved Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s nomination of five new Ministers to head the Ministries of Water Resources, Transport, Housing and Construction, Oil, and Higher Education, Research, and the Sciences. Two of the new Ministers were originally nominated in April and all were put forward for their technical expertise in their respective fields. Parliament also continued its investigation of Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi on allegations of corruption, and scheduled a vote of “no confidence” for the Defense Minister on Tuesday, August 23.
  • On August 16, Sadoun Obeid al-Shaalan was appointed Mayor of Fallujah by the Anbar Provincial Council after Issa al-Issawi refused to resign the position. The reason for al-Issawi’s ouster were not immediately clear. Last month, the Council also ousted Anbar Governor Suhaib al-Rawi, and announced that the former Governor will be questioned during a session next week.

Aided by Coalition Airstrikes, ISF and Peshmerga Forces Move to Encircle Mosul

On August 12, Iraqi Security Forces (ISF), in close coordination with the U.S.-led international coalition, began operations to clear Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants from multiple villages south of Qayyarah, a key town 60 kilometers south of Mosul. According to Ninewa Operations Command, forces from the Iraqi Army’s 15th and 9th divisions initiated their operations in al-Jadaa, a village 65 kilometers south of Mosul, and throughout the day the U.S.-led international coalition launched at least 30 air strikes.

On August 12, Peshmerga forces repelled ISIS attacks west of Tuz Khurmatu, a town 62 kilometers southwest of Kirkuk. According to Major General Abdullah Bour of the Kirkuk Peshmerga, nine Peshmerga fighters were killed and wounded stopping the ISIS militants.

On August 12, multiple U.S.-led international coalition airstrikes targeted ISIS positions south of Mosul. According to an anonymous source, a strike killed at least 15 ISIS militants in Hadi al-Shahada, 55 kilometers south of Mosul, and a strike killed at least 10 militants in central Qayyarah, 60 kilometers south of Mosul.

On August 13, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted an ISIS operational center in Imam al-Gharbi, a town 50 kilometers south of Mosul. According to an anonymous source, nine ISIS militants were killed in the strike.

On August 13, the ISF, in close cooperation with the U.S.-led international coalition, cleared ISIS militants from four villages south of Qayyarah. According to an anonymous source, the villages of Ajaba, Jidaa, Jowan al-Motakhima, and Zahileela were cleared with “minimal” resistance from ISIS militants.

On August 14, Peshmerga forces launched “widespread” operations to clear ISIS militants from multiple villages north of Mosul. According to an anonymous source, the Peshmerga forces will focus on the Khazir area directly north of Mosul “with support” from U.S.-led international coalition airstrikes.

On August 14, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted an ISIS organizational center in Riyadh, 45 kilometers west of Kirkuk. According to an anonymous source, the airstrike killed three and injured seven ISIS militants.

On August 15, Peshmerga forces involved in “widespread” operations in the last few days cleared ISIS militants from 12 villages around Mosul. According to an anonymous source in the security forces in Ninewa, Peshmerga forces operated mainly in Khazir, an area directly north of Mosul, but were also able to make gains in Kweir, an area 20 kilometers southeast of Mosul.

On August 15, Ninewa Operations Command announced that “500 meters” separates ISF from the center of Qayyarah, a key ISIS stronghold 60 kilometers south of Mosul. According to Commander of Ninewa Operations Major General Najm Abdullah al-Jubouri, ISF had taken control of most of the strategically crucial roads and crude oil production sites and will control Qayyarah “in the coming days.”

On August 16, Iraqi Counterterrorism Forces cleared ISIS militants from Howeish, Jowaana, Jibla, and Ghaziya, villages to the south and west of Qayyarah. According to the Iraqi War Media office, ISIS resistance inflicted a “loss of life and equipment,” but that Counterterrorism forces managed to prevail.

On August 16, ISIS militants attacked Peshmerga positions around Sinjar, 120 kilometers west of Mosul. According to an anonymous source involved in the event, Peshmerga units managed to repel the assault and killed 25 ISIS militants in the process.

On August 17, U.S.-led international coalition airstrikes targeted ISIS operational centers in central Mosul. According to an anonymous source, the airstrikes killed at least 50 ISIS militants and destroyed 22 armored vehicles during coordinated attacks.

On August 18, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted a “large” ISIS convoy carrying crude oil away from Qayyarah towards Mosul. According to an anonymous source, the convoy consisted of 30 crude oil tankers and was “completely destroyed” by the airstrike, dealing a critical financial blow to ISIS.

On August 18, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted an ISIS convoy transporting militants from Qayyarah northwards to Mosul. According to an anonymous source, the strike killed 18 militants and destroyed seven vehicles.

On August 18, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted a gathering of ISIS militants in Jidaa, a village 65 kilometers south of Mosul. According to an anonymous source, the airstrike killed three militants and the “ISIS military commander of Qayyarah”, Abu Hathifa.

On August 18, a U.S-led international coalition airstrike targeted a small ISIS convoy in Hay al-Karama, five kilometers to the east of Mosul. According to the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), seven militants were killed and two vehicles were destroyed in the strike.


Conditions Remain Dire for IDPs/Detainees, Despite New Camp Construction

On August 11, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office (ECHO) outlined the security screening process that displaced men and boys from northern Iraq have undergone before being relocated; a process that involves three screening stages in three separate locations each lasting an unspecified amount of time. First, people are taken to a site in Teloul al-Baj, 12 kilometers southwest of Sharqat, and undergo a physical examination administered by the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF). They are then taken by Popular Mobilization Units (PMU) to a second screening site 40 kilometers south where males aged 13 and over are separated from their families. Finally, they are taken to the al-Hajaj Reception Center, 35 kilometers further south, to undergo a second full screening by ISF. Each of the three sites lack water, sanitation services, and shelter.

On August 12, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) announced that they are currently in the process of building two camps around the Mosul area in the Ninewa Province. The Zelkan Camp in the Shikhan District, northwest of Mosul, is half complete with 688 tents out of a projected 1,030. The  Amalla Camp in Telafar District, northwest of Mosul, is undergoing site preparations and will commence construction soon. As displacement is expected to overwhelm capacity, the UNHCR began positioning 10,000 emergency shelter kits that include tools to build a makeshift tent around the province.

On August 12, the UNHCR reported they are meeting with authorities to discuss building a new camp around the Debaga Camp in the Makhmur District. Major congestion still remains even after the organization erected 1,550 new tents and built cooking, washing, sanitation, and electrical facilities.

On August 12, the Government of Belgium allocated approximately US$ 15.12 million for humanitarian and stabilization efforts in Iraq to be delivered over the course of the next two years. The outlays include:

  • United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator’s Budget – US$ 6.72 million
  • UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) – US$ 2.24 million to improve reception of displaced people, camps, water, sanitation, health, and education
  • UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) – US$ 2.24 million
  • UN Organization for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) – US$ 1.12 million
  • UN Development Programme (UNDP) – US$ 2.24 million to the Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilization (FFIS) and will prioritize infrastructure reconstruction and employment projects
  • Demining projects – US$ 560,000

On August 13-15, 6,000 people were displaced from Sharqat, 120 kilometers south of Mosul, and its surrounding areas. This adds to the 69,000 people already displaced from the area since military operations began in June.

On August 14, during a joint conference with the Ministry of Displacement and Migration, the head of the United Nations Assistance Mission to Iraq (UNAMI), Lisa Grande, revealed that the UN is not financially equipped to respond to the impending Mosul humanitarian situation. Minister of Displacement and Migration Jassim Mohammed revealed that his office has not received information about any safe passageways for civilians to leave Mosul. However, the ministry identified areas planned to house and provide relief for people who will be displaced from Mosul. They are:

  • Mosul Dam, 50 kilometers northwest of the city center
  • Makhmur District south of Mosul, 113 kilometers south of Mosul
  • Zammar neighborhood, 80 kilometers southwest of Mosul
  • Rabiaa neighborhood, 118 kilometers southwest of Mosul
  • Areas west of Sinjar, 128 kilometers west of Mosul
  • Areas west of Tal Afar, 80 kilometers west of Mosul
  • Northern areas of the Salah ad-Din Province
  • Various areas around the Kirkuk Province

On August 15, 1,000 IDPs fled Qayyarah and arrived at informal settlements in schools in Hasiyah in Haji Ali,an area 70 kilometers south of Mosul. UNHCR reported urgent water, sanitation, and health needs at this location.

On August 15, the UNHCR announced that 4,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) have arrived at the Debaga camps in the Erbil Province since the beginning of August. The UNHCR reported that on August 1, authorities suspended the relocation program that allows IDPs to leave the camps after documentation. The suspension, coupled by the daily arrivals of new IDPs, continues to congest the Debaga facilities.

On August 15, border control allowed 41 displaced Iraqis to return from Syria after being stranded there after fleeing northern Iraq in  April and May. UNHCR revealed that those displaced are mainly from the Ninewah, Salah ad-Din, and Diyala Provinces. 150 additional Iraqis are expected to be allowed to return from Syria by the end of this week.

On August 16, Amnesty International issued a report detailing the humanitarian crisis in congested areas like the Debaga Camp in the Erbil Province and the displacement camps in the Anbar Province. Both areas lack adequate shelter facilities with IDPs reportedly waiting for weeks for a tent or a place to sleep. In Debaga, hundreds of women and children were placed in the camp’s overcrowded school while men were directed to sleep outside in close proximity to trash and sewage. Food is limited and regularly spoils due to extreme temperatures. Heavy bureaucracy has restricted people’s ability to leave the camps, return to their homes, or seek work. Many boys and men also remain in detention while awaiting security screening in even more dire conditions. Donatella Rovera, Amnesty International’s Senior Crisis Response Advisor, explained that relief needs to be well funded, planned, and implemented or the situation will continue to have disastrous consequences for Iraq and its people.

On August 17, the Mayor of Saadia, Ahmed al-Zerkawshi, reported the return of 189 displaced families to their homes in the town 65 kilometers west of Baquba in the Diyala Province. Al-Zerkawshi confirmed that their returns were in accordance with the legal and security procedures of the Diyala Province and reported that more people will be returning soon.

On August 17, the Director of Migration and Displacement of the Kirkuk Province, Aamar al-Sabah, announced the arrival of 1,573 people displaced from Hawija, 65 kilometers southwest of Kirkuk city, over the last week. The IDPs were taken to the Nazrawah Camp, 15 kilometers east of Kirkuk.

On August 18, the Director of Migration and Displacement of the Kirkuk Province, Ammar al-Sabah, reported that Peshmerga Forces in the Province transferred 62 families held captive by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) to the Nazrawah Camp, 15 kilometers east of Kirkuk.

On August 18, ISIS attacked an IDP camp north of Baiji, 50 kilometers north of Tikrit in Salah ad-Din Province. According to an anonymous source, ISIS militants fired rockets and mortars into the camp, killing 12 and wounding 20 IDPs in the process.


Returns Encouraged Despite Lingering Dangers

From August 11 to 13, over 3,000 people arrived to the Khalidiyah Camp in the Anbar Province after fighting near Ramadi and Therthar intensified.

On August 12, Haditha Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs) announced that multiple PMU battalions “will be ready for action” in western Anbar Province by Sunday, August 15. According to senior Haditha Sheikh and PMU leader Abdullah al-Jagheefi, the Haditha PMUs will coordinate efforts to clear Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants from al-Qa’im, using techniques they developed during “widespread” operations in Hit, 50 kilometers northwest of Ramadi, and in Baghdadi, 80 kilometers northwest of Ramadi.

On August 13, Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) clashed with ISIS militants in Abu Aitha, a village 5 kilometers north of Ramadi. According to an anonymous source, the ISF involved in the fighting were able to intercept groups of ISIS while they were attempting to travel south to Khalidiyah.

On August 13, the Anbar Provincial Council announced that ISF have begun an operation to clear ISIS militants trapped in bunkers and tunnels under Khalidiyah. According to Anbar Provincial Council member Rajaa Barakat al-Aisawi, “dozens” of ISIS militants had already been killed although “many” ISIS militants suspected to be hiding in Khalidiyah had apparently fled to other areas during door-to-door military operations over the last few weeks.

On August 13, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted a gathering of ISIS militants in Jazeera Ramadi, 10 kilometers south of Ramadi. According to an anonymous source, at least 17 ISIS militants were killed and 12 vehicles were destroyed in the strike.

On August 13, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted a convoy of ISIS militants in Sakran, 85 kilometers northwest of Hit. According to a commander in the Haditha PMU Major Issaid al-Jaghifi, the airstrike killed “dozens” of ISIS militants and destroyed “numerous” vehicles while they were attempting to travel east, towards Hit.

On August 14, Head of the District Council of Hit, Mohammad al-Hiti, reported that 40% of the original population, around 70,000 people, returned after ISIS militants were cleared from the city, 70 kilometers west of Ramadi. Al-Hiti continued that hundreds of families remain displaced in Baghdad, other southern provinces, and the northern Kurdistan region and are hesitant to return at risk of disrupting their children’s’ schooling.

On August 14, ISIS militants led sporadic attacks on PMU positions in Abu Aitha, 10 kilometers south of Ramadi. According to a commander of a PMU north of Ramadi, Sheikh Ghossan al-Aithawi, PMU positions were “swifty reinforced” by Iraqi Federal Police and successfully repelled all attacks.

On August 14, the Muthanna Provincial Police requested the Iraqi Federal Government sponsor fortification efforts to halt ISIS infiltration in cities throughout Muthanna Province. According to Muthanna Provincial Police Chief Brigadier General Sami al-Saud, cities such as Samawa, 250 kilometers south of Baghdad, are in “serious need” of trenches, walls, and increased roadside checkpoints to prevent ISIS militants based in Anbar Province from threatening Muthanna’s security.

On August 15, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reported that the Baghdad Provincial Council announced they will reclaim schools that are currently housing IDPs from Fallujah. The Council called on people displaced from other areas in the Anbar Province to return by September 1.

On August 16, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted an ISIS vehicle in Bakr, a town directly across the Euphrates from Hit. According to Jazeera Operations commander Major General Qassim al-Muhammadi, the vehicle was carrying three ISIS militants and weapons toward Hit but was “completely destroyed” by the airstrike.

On August 16, the Mayor of Ramadi Ibrahim al-Aousej survived an assassination attempt in central Ramadi in broad daylight. According to an anonymous source, multiple vehicles approached Mayor al-Aousej’s convoy and opened fire resulting in the death of one of al-Aousej’s bodyguards.

On August 16, Mayor of Julawla, Youssef Yacoub, announced the return of 9,000 of the city’s residents, but warned that if services, mainly electricity and water, are not restored soon it could result in a “reverse exodus.” Approximately 3,000 remain displaced from the town located between Kirkuk and Baghdad in the Diyala Province.

On August 17, Anbar Operations Command announced that over 700 ISIS militants had been killed by door-to-door ISF operations in Khalidiya, a town 20 kilometers east of Ramadi. According to Anbar Operations Commander Major General Ismail al-Mahlawi, progress has been “thorough and challenging” as many ISIS militants had taken to tunnels and bunkers.

On August 17, ISIS militants launched a “large” attack on ISF/PMU positions around Haditha, 110 kilometers northwest of Ramadi. According to Haditha PMU Commander Sheikh Abdullah al-Jaghifi, the assault was successfully repelled by ISF/PMU forces and “dozens” of ISIS militants had been killed.

On August 17, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted ISIS militants in Abu Ali, 15 kilometers northeast of Ramadi. According to Anbar Operations Commander Major General Ismail al-Mahlawi, five ISIS militants had fortified a small house but were all killed during the strike.

On August 17, a U.S.-led international coalition airstrike targeted ISIS mortar and rocket positions in Bakr, directly across the Euphrates from Hit. According to Jazeera Operations Commander Major General Qassim al-Muhammadi, the airstrike destroyed three positions and killed 10 ISIS militants.


5 New Ministers Take Office as Defense Minister’s Future Remains Uncertain

On August 14, an anonymous senior political source revealed that Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi received recommendations for five candidates to fill vacant ministerial seats. He immediately rejected the suggestion of Qasim al-Araji to be the Minister of Interior for his allegiance to the Badr political organization and of Kazem Finjan to be Minister of Transport for his lack of administrative experience. Both Jabbar al-Laebi (Oil) and Nafaa al-Osei (Housing) were nominated in early April of this year in what was dubbed Abadi’s “technocrat cabinet.”

On August 15, the Iraqi Parliament held its twelfth session of 2016 with 201 Members attending, including Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. The Members of Parliament approved five new ministerial appointees, continued questioning the Minister of Defense, Khaled al-Obeidi, over allegations of corruption, and vote on an Amnesty Law.

On August 15, five new ministers were sworn in during the Iraqi Parliament’s 12th session of the first legislative term of the year. Turkmen deputies were reported to have objected to the appointment of Nafaa al-Osai to be Minister of Reconstruction and Housing. The Cabinet has seen numerous resignations in 2016, including six in July, and the disappearance of the Minister of Trade following the announcement of corruption investigations. The five newly approved ministers are:

  • Minister of Higher Education, Research, and Sciences – Abdel Razzaq al-Issa
    • Previously the President of Kufa University in the Najaf Province and professor of Biochemistry.
  • Minister of Water Resources – Hassan al-Janabi
    • Previously a water engineer who lived in exile in Sydney, Australia, Janabi returned to Iraq to be a Senior Water Advisor to the Ministry of Water Resources. Janabi is also most recently the Permanent Representative to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in Rome, Italy.
  • Minister of Transport – Kazem Finjan
    • Kazem Finjan’s nomination was accepted by the Prime Minister, despite original objections. Finjan is a former pilot.
  • Minister of Housing and Construction – Nafaa al-Osai
    • Oldest independent civil engineer in Baghdad with a PhD and 30 years of experience working on reconstruction and service projects.
  • Minister of Oil – Jabbar al-Laebi
    • Most recently al-Laebi was an advisor to the Ministry and was the Director General of the South Oil Company after spending many years as an engineer and manager of planning and budget departments.

On August 15, a Member of Parliament revealed that Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi expressed his disapproval of politically-motivated questioning, alluding Parliament’s interrogation of Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi on corruption charges. During the parliament session, Speaker of Parliament Salim al-Jabouri said that questioning is a constitutional right of parliament and asked the Prime Minister not to speak during the questioning of al-Obeidi.

On August 15, Speaker of Parliament Salim al-Jabouri scheduled a vote of no confidence for Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi for next Tuesday, August 23, after 63 Members of Parliament submitted a petition to include the vote on the agenda. Various parliament members expressed discontent over the answers given by the al-Obeidi during his public questioning two weeks prior.

On August 16, newly appointed Minister of Oil Jabbar al-Laebi, met with deputy ministers and generals and emphasized the importance of teamwork to maintain oil wealth, increase production, and increase investment in natural gas.

On August 16, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced that he will continue to conduct deliberations to choose the new Minister of Interior after the former Minister resigned in the aftermath of the bombing in Baghdad’s Karradah neighborhood last month. Al-Abadi also vowed to fill the seats of Minister of Industry, Minister of Trade, and Minister of Commerce.

On August 16, during a press conference, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi expressed his surprise for the quick scheduling of Parliament’s examination of Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi on corruption charges. The Prime Minister said that it was a mistake not to postpone the investigation until after efforts to clear Mosul of Islamic State or Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants is complete. Al-Abadi explained that should the need arise, he will personally take over the Ministry of Defense if al-Obeidi is dismissed from his post. He said that soldiers must be confident that the establishment they are fighting for is not corrupt.

On August 17, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi released a statement clarifying that he fully respects the decisions made by the judiciary concerning investigations of Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi on corruption charges. Al-Abadi added that he believes in the importance of separation of powers between the legislative and judicial branches.

On August 18, newly appointed Minister of Oil Jabbar al-Laebi, met with managers within the ministry and drew up an action plan to increase oil and gas production and reduce oil imports by half. Al-Laebi plans to work with specialized companies to locate crude oil and diesel and hopes Iraq will be the top exporter of oil to the world.

On August 18, Qais al-Khazali, leader of the largest Shia Popular Mobilization Unit (PMU), said that if the Minister of Defense is removed from office, it will not greatly affect military field operations.


Political Challenges in Fallujah as Reconstruction Resumes

On August 13, Mayor of Fallujah Issa al-Isawi refused to resign from his post according to his prospective replacement Sadoun Obeid al-Shaalan. This comes after the Anbar Provincial Council voted to remove al-Isawi and install al-Shaalan in his place because members of the council found al-Issawi’s appointment to be illegal. However, al-Issawi claimed that his forced removal would be illegal.

On August 13, the Anbar Provincial Council demanded information on the whereabouts of the 823 missing civilians from Fallujah, Garma, and Saqlawiyah during a meeting with security leaders. Provincial Council Member Salma Ahmed Lafi called on authorities to return the missing people, make their bodies accessible for burial if they were killed, and prosecute their captors. The whereabouts of the missing people have been unknown since June much to the dismay of displaced families, authorities, and human rights organizations.

On August 16, Sadoun Obeid al-Shaalan was appointed Mayor of Fallujah after Issa al-Issawi was forced to resign from the position. Al-Issawi said the political changes were unconstitutional.

On August 16, Arkan al-Tirmooz, Member of the Anbar Provincial Council, welcomed the appointment of Sadoun Obeid al-Shaalan as the new Mayor of Fallujah and explained that a committee within the province will oversee the work of the mayor while he works to reconstruct and rehabilitate the city.

On August 16, the Anbar Provincial Council announced that they will be questioning the recently removed Governor of Anbar, Suhaib al-Rawi, on Tuesday, August 23. The council vaguely explained that the questioning will be conducted by a legal committee and will focus on potential negligence and legal violations. The council previously attempted to question the Governor on July 23, 2016, but al-Rawi failed to attend and instead checked into a hospital in Baghdad. At that time, the council voted to remove him from his post.

On August 17, Sabah Karhout, President of the Anbar Provincial Council, announced the dissolution of the 22 committees of the council, removal of the chairmen of the committees, and the establishment of a 15 day deadline to restructure the committees to be more effective.

On August 17, the new Mayor of Fallujah, Sadoun Obeid al-Shaalan, announced that 25% of Fallujah is destroyed and that the first order of business will be restoring bridges, cleaning waste, dismantling improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and strengthening local security.

On August 17, Fallujah Police Chief Jamal al-Jumaili announced that ten ISIS prisons were uncovered in private homes and basements throughout Fallujah, containing the bodies of 13 people who had been imprisoned and tortured before the city was cleared. Al-Jumaili, while praising the efforts of Iraqi Security Forces to find these prisons, suggested that “many more” prisons will be found throughout the city during ongoing door-to-door efforts.


DateLocationDeathsInjuries
08/18/16al-Amin, Eastern Baghdad27
08/18/16al-Doura, Southern Baghdad16
08/18/16al-Amiriyah, South of Fallujah12
08/18/16Latifiyah, South of Baghdad22
08/18/16Tarmiya, North of Baghdad38
08/17/16Rashidiya, Northern Baghdad05
08/17/16Boub al-Sham, North of Baghdad15
08/17/16Nifiq al-Shorta, Western Baghdad10
08/17/16Jisr Diyala, Southeast of Baghdad17
08/17/16Ghazalia, Western Baghdad27
08/17/16Shaab, Northern Baghdad17
08/16/16al-Kweir, Southwest of Mosul05
08/16/16Ataifiya, Northern Baghdad27
08/16/16al-Bab al-Sharqi, Central Baghdad18
08/16/16al-Nahrwan, Southeast of Baghdad25
08/16/16Hay al-Amal, Southwest of Baghdad26
08/16/16al-Mada'in, South of Baghdad22
08/16/16Kilo 170, West of Ramadi04
08/15/16Sabaa al-Bour, 28
08/15/16Shaala, Northwestern Baghdad28
08/15/16Sharqat, South of Mosul50
08/15/16al-Doura, Southern Baghdad16
08/14/16Mahmoudiya, South of Baghdad25
08/14/16al-Taji, North of Baghdad14
08/14/16al-Doura, Southern Baghdad27
08/14/16al-Shaab, Northern Baghdad25
08/14/16al-Kiba, North of Baquba10
08/13/16al-Biyaa, Southwestern Baghdad17
08/13/16al-Shaab, Northern Baghdad23
08/13/16Yousifiya, Southern Baghdad10
08/13/16al-Nairiya, East of Baghdad17
08/13/16al-Mada'in, South of Baghdad25
08/13/16Baghdad al-Jadeeda, Eastern Baghdad10
08/13/16al-Kafah, Central Baghdad17
08/12/16al-Baladiyat, Eastern Baghdad17
08/12/16al-Tarmiyah, North of Baghdad26
08/12/16Sharqat, South of Mosul20

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center. ISHM’s research methodology was developed by EPIC’s Senior Visiting Fellow Ahmed Ali. 


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